Nobel Bondage

One of the most fruitful decades of chemical research began on 6 April 1931, with a landmark paper by Linus Pauling on the relationship between chemical bonds and the magnetic properties of substances. As a young professor at the California Institute of Technology, Pauling realized that he could explain the magnetism of certain molecules by the arrangements of their electrons and that this approach satisfied the predictions of quantum mechanics. He developed the concept of electronegativity, or the ability of an atom to attract electrons in a chemical bond.

In 1939, Pauling summarized these and other ideas in a book, The Nature of the Chemical Bond, and the Structure of Molecules and Crystals. The monograph, considered one of the most important works in the history of chemistry, won him the 1954 Nobel Prize in chemistry. Pauling died in 1994.

Posted in Chemistry