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  • Eli is a contributing correspondent for Science magazine.
 

Krugman Bearish on Economic Forecasting

7 April 2010 5:36 pm
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In a long piece, Princeton University economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman says economic forecasting models used to analyze proposed energy policies are insufficient for the task:

There are, of course, a number of ways this kind of modeling could be wrong. Many of the underlying estimates are necessarily somewhat speculative; nobody really knows, for instance, what solar power will cost once it finally becomes a large-scale proposition. There is also reason to doubt the assumption that people actually make the right choices: many studies have found that consumers fail to take measures to conserve energy, like improving insulation, even when they could save money by doing so.

But while it's unlikely that these models get everything right, it's a good bet that they overstate rather than understate the economic costs of climate-change action. That is what the experience from the cap-and-trade program for acid rain suggests: costs came in well below initial predictions. And in general, what the models do not and cannot take into account is creativity; surely, faced with an economy in which there are big monetary payoffs for reducing greenhouse-gas emissions, the private sector will come up with ways to limit emissions that are not yet in any model.

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