Andrew Winning/REUTERS; iStockphoto/Thinkstock; Johan Reinhard-Leslie

Top Stories: The Secret of Monogamy, Resetting Your Body’s Clock, and Drunk Human Sacrifices

Monogamy May Have Evolved to Prevent Infanticide

Human males and females have a strong tendency to live together in monogamous pairs, albeit for highly varied periods of time and degrees of fidelity. Just how such behavior arose has been the topic of much debate among researchers. A new study comes to a startling conclusion: Among primates, including perhaps humans, monogamy evolved because it protected infants from being killed by rival males.

Obama’s Nominee for NSF Director Explains Why She Said Yes

President Barack Obama this week nominated France Córdova, a 65-year-old astrophysicist, to become the second woman, and first Latina, to lead the $7 billion National Science Foundation. In an exclusive interview with ScienceInsider, she’s refreshingly candid about why she decided to add another chapter to her illustrious career as an academic scientist, university administrator, and public servant.

Déjà Vu: Second Probe Finds Problems With Hypertension Drug Trials

Claims made for the beneficial effects of a leading hypertension drug continue to unravel. A second medical school in Japan has found data manipulation and an undisclosed conflict of interest in a paper resulting from a large clinical trial of valsartan, which was originally approved in Japan for the treatment of high blood pressure in 2000. However, an investigative committee later found that a substantial amount of data from postmarketing clinical trials did not match patient records, indicating deliberate manipulation.

Waking Up Tired? Blame Electricity

Our internal clocks are drifting out of sync, and indoor lighting may be to blame. A new study suggests that just a few days in the great outdoors puts us back in tune with the solar cycle, and reconnecting with the sun could make us less drowsy.

'Llullaillaco Maiden' May Have Been Drugged Before Sacrificed

More than 500 years ago, three children climbed Llullaillaco volcano in Argentina and never came down, the probable victims of human sacrifice. Since their well-preserved mummies were discovered in 1999, scientists have studied them in hopes of reconstructing the last months of their lives. New evidence shows that all three regularly ingested coca and alcohol and suggests that the drugs might have played a more-than-ceremonial role in their deaths.

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