Hoping to clone a woolly mammoth, Hwang (second from left) and colleagues have ventured twice to northern Siberia in search of well-preserved remains of the extinct beast.

Sooam Biotech Research Foundation

Resurrection team. Hoping to clone a woolly mammoth, Hwang (second from left) and colleagues have ventured twice to northern Siberia in search of well-preserved remains of the extinct beast.

After Fraud, Korean Cloner Seeks Redemption

Woo Suk Hwang shot to fame in early 2004 for two papers in Science offering hope that cloned human stem cells could be used to treat diseases. Within months, the South Korean veterinarian had admitted that data in both papers were fabricated, and he was dismissed from his university post. Hwang is now staging a comeback in animal cloning—the field he started out in before his fall from grace.

For the full story, see this week's issue of Science.

Posted in Asia/Pacific, Biology, Plants & Animals