Diuretic Drug Offers Latest Hope for Autism Treatment

California News Correspondent

A drug used for decades to treat high blood pressure and other conditions has shown promise in a small clinical trial for autism. The drug, bumetanide, reduced the overall severity of behavioral symptoms after 3 months of daily treatment. The researchers say that many parents of children who received the drug reported that their children were more "present" and engaged in social interactions after taking it. The new findings are among several recent signs that treatments to address the social deficits at the core of autism may be on the horizon.

Several lines of evidence suggest that autism interferes with the neurotransmitter GABA, which typically puts a damper on neural activity. Bumetanide may enhance the inhibitory effects of GABA, and the drug has been used safely as a diuretic to treat a wide range of heart, lung, and kidney conditions. In the new study, researchers led by Yehezkel Ben-Ari at the Mediterranean Institute of Neurobiology in Marseille, France, recruited 60 autistic children between the ages of 3 and 11 and randomly assigned them to receive either a daily pill of bumetanide or a placebo. (Neither the children's parents nor the researchers who assessed the children knew who received the actual drug.)

As a group, those who got bumetanide improved by 5.6 points on a 60-point scale that's often used to assess behaviors related to autism, the researchers report today in Translational Psychiatry. That was enough to nudge the group average just under the cutoff for severe autism and into the mild to medium category. The study did not look directly at whether the drug improved all symptoms equally or some more than others. "We have some indications that the symptoms particularly ameliorated with bumetanide are the genuine core symptoms of autism, namely communication and social interactions," Ben-Ari says. More work will be needed to verify that impression. Ben-Ari says his team is now preparing for a larger, multicenter trial in Europe.

The current study already looks interesting to some. "It's enough to make me think about trying it in a few of my autism patients who haven't responded to other interventions," says Randi Hagerman, a pediatrician who studies neurodevelopmental disorders at the University of California, Davis. Social interactions tend to be reinforcing, Hagerman adds, so getting an autistic child to start interacting more can have a positive effect on subsequent brain development.

Other drugs have recently shown promise for autism. In September, Hagerman and colleagues reported that arbaclofen, a drug that stimulates a type of GABA receptor, reduced social avoidance in people with fragile X syndrome, a genetic disorder that shares many features with autism. Many researchers are also hopeful about clinical trials under way with drugs that block certain receptors for glutamate, the main neurotransmitter in the brain that excites neural activity. Results from those trials should come out next year.

All of this work, including the new study, suggests that drugs that reduce neural excitation by blocking glutamate or enhance inhibition by boosting GABA may be helpful for treating autism, says Elizabeth Berry-Kravis, a pediatric neurologist at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, and a collaborator on the recent arbaclofen study. "There seems to be this imbalance between excitation and inhibition in people with autism."

That's a potentially game-changing insight. Now doctors can only prescribe drugs that treat individual symptoms of autism rather than the underlying cause of the disorder, Berry-Kravis says. Doctors often prescribe antipsychotic drugs to reduce irritability, for example, but those drugs don't address the social and communication problems at the heart of the disorder. "It's exciting that now we're thinking about the underlying mechanisms and treating those."

Posted in Health, Brain & Behavior