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Biology

  • 25 Jul 1997

    BOZEMAN, MONTANA--Antibodies in mother's milk help protect newborn mammals against many infectious diseases in the critical first few weeks of life.

  • 23 Jul 1997

    There's a new way to watch proteins shimmy and dance as they carry out their biological tasks. Researchers traditionally follow these shape changes spectroscopically, deducing them from changes in the molecules' ability to absorb particular wavelengths of light.

  • 18 Jul 1997

    In search of tiny amounts of antibodies, medical physicist Rosalyn Yalow developed a technique that came up very big for biomedical researchers.

  • 18 Jul 1997

    The first genome sequence of a commercially and scientifically valuable group of bacteria has been completed by an international team led by researchers in the European Union (EU).

  • 17 Jul 1997

    Several fatal neurological diseases--including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep--are marked by the accumulation of protein deposits in the brain.

  • 15 Jul 1997

    Killing off a pneumonia-causing bacterium in infected cardiac patients reduced the risk of a second heart attack, cardiologists have found.

  • 15 Jul 1997

    A child born to a mother with a high fever during labor and delivery could be up to nine times as likely to develop cerebral palsy (CP) as one born to a healthy mother.

  • 14 Jul 1997

    On this day in 1970, molecular biologist Hamilton Smith broke new ground for biotechnology. In two papers published in the Journal of Molecular Biology, he described a new class of enzymes--restriction enzymes--that scientists now use to precisely snip DNA.

  • 11 Jul 1997

    Claude Bernard, a French researcher credited with founding the field of experimental medicine, was born on 12 July 1813. While conducting experiments on an animal fed a sugar-free diet, Bernard discovered that the liver stores sugar as glycogen.

  • 10 Jul 1997

    A fatal ailment that triggers heart failure in children--apparently never seen before--has surfaced in Malaysia. A team of experts from the U.S.

  • 10 Jul 1997

    Scientists have tracked down the gene for a fatal disorder of the nervous system that strikes in childhood.

  • 9 Jul 1997

    Like a mark of death, engineered proteins called monoclonal antibodies are supposed to stick to cancer cells and flag down immune fighters to destroy a tumor. But such a strategy, for some unknown reason, has generally failed.

  • 9 Jul 1997

    Researchers have found that the brains of people who grow up bilingual process the two languages differently from those who learn a second tongue later in life.

  • 8 Jul 1997

    Women can suffer severe problems, such as osteoporosis, after their reproductive hormones dry up. Now comes new evidence that men, too, tend to fall apart as their blood levels of a sex hormone--in this case, testosterone--drop.

  • 7 Jul 1997

    Camillo Golgi, an Italian physician famed for his microscopic studies of the nervous system, was born on this day in 1843. When he was 30, Golgi invented a technique for staining cells that allowed him to view neurons in fine detail.

  • 7 Jul 1997

    Scientists have discovered a gene that, when mutated, makes mice grow obese without boosting their appetite. The finding, reported in tomorrow's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, surprisingly suggests that white blood cells, key immune fighters, help regulate body fat.

  • 3 Jul 1997

    Some cases of a fatal neurodegenerative disorder linked last fall to "mad cow disease" may not be triggered by the agent that most scientists have suspected.

  • 2 Jul 1997

    The world's hardiest microbes--those that have become resistant to traditional antibiotics--are now under surveillance. Medical researchers have launched a new program, called Sentry, that links up 72 hospitals and clinics worldwide to keep tabs on these scourges.

  • 2 Jul 1997

    A perplexing thing about penguins is that they can stay underwater longer than we can, even though their blood is no more rich in oxygen than ours. Now scientists may have figured out how penguins do it: The birds cut blood flow to inactive organs and go into hypothermia.

  • 1 Jul 1997

    Patients recovering from anorexia nervosa appear to have abnormal levels of the weight-regulating hormone leptin. The findings, reported in two pilot trials, suggest that body chemistry--in addition to mental state--impedes anorexic patients from reaching a healthy weight.

  • 30 Jun 1997

    After taking a several-month hiatus from the Russian science scene, philanthropist George Soros is at it again: The billionaire financier has ponied up $3 million to create two new labs in Moscow to study tuberculosis and hospital-borne infections.

  • 27 Jun 1997

    On this day in 1970, U.S. virologist David Baltimore published a breakthrough paper in Nature describing reverse transcription. The process enables some viruses to insert their genetic material into the DNA of healthy human cells, which can lead to tumors and other diseases.

  • 27 Jun 1997

    The sea lamprey, unlike a person or any other higher vertebrate for that matter, can repair its spinal cord when it is severed. Now researchers have a hint of where this primitive fish gets its regenerative powers.

  • 27 Jun 1997

    Kiss the wrong person and you might get mononucleosis, which could mean days laid up in bed with swollen glands and fatigue. For monkeys, however, the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) responsible for mono is often the kiss of death, which has been a big hurdle to studying the bug in primate models.

  • 27 Jun 1997

    A genetic mutation that can delay the onset of AIDS in people infected with HIV may hasten death after symptoms of the disease appear.

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