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Health

  • 28 Jan 1997

    University officials are applauding a federal appeals court decision throwing out charges by a former graduate student that her school defrauded the federal government by wrongly taking credit for her work in grant applications.

  • 28 Jan 1997

    BETHESDA, MARYLAND--Recent reports that the DNA of a monkey virus called SV40 lurks in some rare types of human cancers has reignited a nearly 40-year-old controversy over the safety of a polio vaccine that was widely administered in the late 1950s.

  • 28 Jan 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--There may be a magic bullet after all.

  • 27 Jan 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C--Unsuccessful attempts to unravel how a vaccine against the monkey version of the AIDS virus actually works have led to renewed calls for testing a similar--but potentially risky--vaccine in humans.

  • 24 Jan 1997

    An inexpensive cholera vaccine has performed well in a pilot trial in Vietnam.

  • 24 Jan 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--In another tantalizing sign that the AIDS epidemic is abating in the United States, dramatic data presented here today reveal a sharp drop in AIDS-related deaths in New York City in 1996.

  • 23 Jan 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--The most influential annual AIDS meeting in the United States kicked off here last night under tight security in response to threats from activists to interrupt the gathering.

  • 23 Jan 1997

    WASHINGTON--A blue-ribbon panel commissioned by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to assess whether women in their 40s should receive mammograms has ducked the contentious issue of whether such a test should be recommended for all women in this age group.

  • 23 Jan 1997

    Traditional cancer treatments attack the malignant cells directly, with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. But two studies to be reported tomorrow advance a promising new strategy: cutting off the blood vessels that deliver the oxygen and nutrients that tumors need to live and grow.

  • 23 Jan 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Scientists from Abbott Laboratories announced here today that they have begun clinical trials on a new anti-HIV drug that they claim is 10 times more potent than one of the most powerful AIDS drugs now on the market.

  • 22 Jan 1997

    If looks can kill, why not try look-alikes? Scientists have used a molecular imprint--something akin to a plaster cast--of a fungus-killing compound produced by yeast to make a protein that appears to be lethal to a common fungus that infects people.

  • 22 Jan 1997

    In almost every episode of the TV hospital drama ER, doctors rush to a gurney, yell "Vfib!" and slap electric paddles onto a patient's chest.

  • 17 Jan 1997

    Tomorrow is the birthday of German surgeon and physiologist Kaspar Friedrich Wolff, born in 1733.

  • 16 Jan 1997

    Scientists have bred a new kind of mouse that suffers from atherosclerosis when fed a high-fat Western diet.

  • 15 Jan 1997

    Researchers have isolated a new strain of herpesvirus from cells of Kaposi's sarcoma, the most common cancer in AIDS patients. The achievement, reported in tomorrow's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, may help researchers explore how the new virus is spread.

  • 15 Jan 1997

    LONDON--An epidemic of a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that was linked last fall to "mad cow disease" could be unfolding, warned British scientists in a press conference here today.

  • 14 Jan 1997

    A controversial new study has put a cloud over one of the most stunning successes in AIDS. The anti-HIV drug AZT, when given to pregnant women infected with HIV, can reduce the likelihood of mother-to-child transmission by nearly 70%.

  • 13 Jan 1997

    Groundbreaking work on cancer-causing chemicals and new manufacturing paradigms has earned four U.S. and Japanese researchers the 1997 Japan Prize, a lucrative award that sometimes foreshadows a Nobel Prize.

  • 10 Jan 1997

    Tomorrow is the 73rd birthday of one of the founders of neuroendocrinology, Roger Guillemin. He and a competing group led by Andrew Schally showed that the hypothalamus, a brain region, regulates the pituitary gland by secreting chemicals called hormones into the bloodstream.

  • 9 Jan 1997

    There's only one sure way to know whether someone is suffering from a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that was linked last fall to "mad cow disease": Wait until the person dies, and look for the disease's trademark signs in a slice of brain tissue.

  • 9 Jan 1997

    A battery of lab tests has indicated that a chemical found in grapes and other fruits and vegetables is a potential antitumor agent.

  • 8 Jan 1997

    After decades of disappointment, U.S. and European scientists have created a synthetic vaccine that offered some protection against malaria in a small pilot test.

  • 8 Jan 1997

    WASHINGTON--The controversy over Gulf War syndrome is unlikely to die anytime soon: Several studies released at a press conference here today suggest that the vague symptoms reported by some Gulf veterans may result from genuine illnesses caused by exposure

  • 7 Jan 1997

    Scientists appear to have unraveled a mysterious chain of biochemical events that leads to scleroderma, a sometimes-fatal immune disease.

  • 3 Jan 1997

    Leptin, a hormone that became famous in 1994 for its potential antiobesity effects, may also play a key role in the onset of puberty in mice, says a report in today's Science magazine.

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