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Science News

  • 13 May 1998

    Compared to a Neandertal's jutting mug, a modern human face is flat--tucked under its brain case in a vertical line. Now a researcher says this facial makeover stemmed from a single change in the development of the skull.

  • 13 May 1998

    India conducted a second round of nuclear testing today, exploding two sub-kiloton warheads at an underground facility in the Thar desert.

  • 13 May 1998

    Researchers have the first strong evidence that a brain chemical called serotonin plays an important role in drug addiction.

  • 13 May 1998

    Thin and iridescent as soap bubbles, porous silicon wafers hardly seem like the stuff of a future generation of computers. But they do one thing that run-of-the-mill silicon chips can't: They glow.

  • 12 May 1998

    A DNA sequencing maverick is joining with the world's largest maker of automated sequencing machines to form a new company that they say will "substantially complete the sequence" of the entire human genome in 3 years.

  • 12 May 1998

    After 10 years of intense debate, the European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium, today approved new European patent legislation for biotechnology. The controversial directive affirms the right to stake claims on transgenic plants and human gene sequences that could be used to develop drugs.

  • 12 May 1998

    The popular notion that medieval cathedral windows have thickened at the bottom--by slowly flowing like a liquid--doesn't hold water.

  • 12 May 1998

    Scientists have found evidence that a surprising amount of pack ice in the Arctic Ocean melted last summer.

  • 11 May 1998

    Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, a British x-ray crystallographer who won the 1964 Nobel Prize in chemistry for her cutting-edge work determining the molecular structures of complex organic molecules, was born on 10 May 1910.

  • 11 May 1998

    The space shuttle Discovery will blast into orbit on 2 June to test out a detector designed to probe the universe for antimatter. This is the first search for antimatter to be conducted from space--far from the interfering effects of Earth's atmosphere.

  • 11 May 1998

    NEW DELHI--The Indian government resumed nuclear testing today, exploding three warheads simultaneously at Pokharan in the Thar desert in northwest India.

  • 8 May 1998

    Blood is known to spiral as it flows through arteries, but researchers at a Royal Academy of Engineering conference announced yesterday in London that these helical streams themselves whirl like a corkscrew.

  • 8 May 1998

    Walking in high heels does more than just spur bunions and lower back pain--it also may lead to bum knees, researchers report in tomorrow's Lancet.

  • 8 May 1998

    A study of interplanetary dust has dealt a setback to an upstart proposal about what drives the ice ages.

  • 8 May 1998

    By outfitting a PET scanner with a virtual reality world, researchers have mapped brain regions as a person navigates through an environment.

  • 7 May 1998

    It's been almost 5 years since comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke up and smashed into Jupiter, but shock waves from the impacts are still reverberating around the Hollywood solar system.

  • 7 May 1998

    A sperm fast and lucky enough to fertilize an egg gets to pass on its genes. But now researchers have shown, for flies at least, that the champion meets an ignoble end: After hanging out in the embryo during development, the sperm's remnants are excreted when the larvae hatches.

  • 7 May 1998

    The mental centers for speech and writing, long thought to be in the same side of the brain, can reside in different hemispheres.

  • 7 May 1998

    The full-scale, $10 billion version of a proposed fusion power test-bed appears to be defunct. The troubled International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) received little support from U.S.

  • 6 May 1998

    Scientists have measured remarkably high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the soil near dead trees on the flanks of California's Mammoth Mountain, a dormant volcano.

  • 6 May 1998

    Scientists have found that one form of a gene linked to Alzheimer's disease fails to get mouse nerve cells to grow, although a more common form does stimulate growth.

  • 6 May 1998

    The mutation that causes cystic fibrosis may actually serve a useful purpose: protecting against typhoid fever. The finding, reported in tomorrow's issue of Nature, may help explain why this invariably fatal inherited disease is so prevalent today.

  • 6 May 1998

    Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt today proclaimed 29 species once on the brink of extinction--including the bald eagle, gray wolf, and peregrine falcon--healthy enough to be removed from the endangered species list.

  • 5 May 1998

    On this day in 1984, virologist Robert Gallo and his co-workers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health published four groundbreaking papers in Science in which they provided persuasive evidence that AIDS is caused by a retrovirus.

  • 5 May 1998

    The White House is mum, but the word on the street is that the Administration plans to nominate political scientist Kenneth Prewitt for the unenviable job of Census Bureau director.

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