Subscribe
 

Science News

  • 6 May 1998

    Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt today proclaimed 29 species once on the brink of extinction--including the bald eagle, gray wolf, and peregrine falcon--healthy enough to be removed from the endangered species list.

  • 5 May 1998

    On this day in 1984, virologist Robert Gallo and his co-workers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health published four groundbreaking papers in Science in which they provided persuasive evidence that AIDS is caused by a retrovirus.

  • 5 May 1998

    The White House is mum, but the word on the street is that the Administration plans to nominate political scientist Kenneth Prewitt for the unenviable job of Census Bureau director.

  • 5 May 1998

    Turning a deaf ear to scientists' pleas, the U.S. government plans to sequester the only fragments not already in its hands of that famous early American, Kennewick Man. A federal task force is to decide what to do with the bones.

  • 5 May 1998

    With no thoughts of having children, monks and nuns and worker bees can dedicate themselves to a life of selflessly serving others. Now, researchers have put abstinence to work in mammalian cells: When prevented from dividing, the cells crank up their protein output 30-fold.

  • 4 May 1998

    Tired of that old Matisse print? Try the spiffy new nuclear physics poster. The giant chart aims to bring the world of nuclear energy, radioactive decay, and quark-gluon plasma to high school classrooms.

  • 4 May 1998

    Cutting corners is a bad idea if you want to help rainforests grow. That's because square tropical forest fragments aren't hospitable to shade-loving seedlings, according to a report in the May issue of Conservation Biology.

  • 4 May 1998

    Scientists have built an artificial human chromosome using only known DNA regions. The chromosome, described in the May issue of Nature Biotechnology, is a step toward someday introducing therapeutic genes into the nuclei of human cells in the body.

  • 1 May 1998

    This month marks the 150th anniversary of the lecture in which English physicist James Prescott Joule announced his profound discovery of how heat given off by one source is absorbed by another and never lost from a system.

  • 1 May 1998

    Russian President Boris Yeltsin and his young premier didn't have to look far to find their new science minister: He was the previous chief's boss. Yesterday, Yeltsin and Prime Minister Sergei Kiriyenko announced that reform-minded politician Vladimir Bulgak will head up the science ministry.

  • 1 May 1998

    Scientists have concocted a virus that sneaks toxins into cancer cells. The technique, described in the current issue of Nature Biotechnology, could be particularly useful for decimating residual cancer cells after a tumor is surgically removed.

  • 1 May 1998

    Nostalgia may be one good reason for restoring bison to the North American plains, but now there's a scientific incentive as well: Bison appear to help keep grassland ecosystems healthy.

  • 30 Apr 1998

    Ancient lakes across a huge portion of the western United States may have been so acidic their waters would have dissolved a person's skin. The discovery, reported in the 30 April Nature, may force a reevaluation of some of Earth's old watering holes.

  • 30 Apr 1998

    The deadly disease anthrax has been much in the news lately--thanks largely to fears that rogue leaders or terrorists will attempt to wage germ warfare with the anthrax bacillus.

  • 30 Apr 1998

    For Einstein's theory of gravity to hold water, it must be impossible to glimpse the heart of a black hole--a point where the force of gravity is infinite, called a singularity--even from a prime viewing spot inside.

  • 29 Apr 1998

    A robotic vacuum has retrieved thousands of particles that journeyed from the chill of outer space to the frigid depths of a water well at the South Pole.

  • 29 Apr 1998

    Forest Ray Moulton, an American astronomer known for a dominant early theory on how planets form, was born on this day in 1872.

  • 29 Apr 1998

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) yesterday announced the election of 60 new members and 15 foreign associates, including British mathematician Roger Penrose. Membership is considered one of the highest honors accorded to a scientist.

  • 29 Apr 1998

    Mammals were already a diverse bunch during the age of dinosaurs, according to a molecular clock based on genes from hundreds of vertebrate species.

  • 28 Apr 1998

    Scientists in half a dozen countries have been vying to work with Nobel laureate D. Carleton Gajdusek, who was released from prison this week after serving a year on charges of child sexual abuse.

  • 28 Apr 1998

    Armchair scientists can venture 2 kilometers underground Tuesday morning to tour the newly completed Solar Neutrino Observatory (SNO).

  • 28 Apr 1998

    Vast tornadoes ravage the sun at speeds up to 200,000 kilometers per hour, astronomers reported today at a meeting at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) near Oxford, U.K., celebrating the extension of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite for a further 5 years.

  • 28 Apr 1998

    Scientists have found a mutation that leads to an inherited form of heart failure. The defective gene, reported in the 1 May issue of Science, may help researchers understand what makes the heart tissue slowly waste away--and how to slow this disease's progression.

  • 27 Apr 1998

    Naturalist John James Audubon, renowned for his intricate paintings of North American birds, was born on 26 April 1785 in what is now Haiti. Audubon grew up in France and emigrated to the United States in 1803.

  • 27 Apr 1998

    Many wine lovers uncork a bottle of their favorite red and set it aside for a few minutes to let it breathe.

Pages