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Science News

  • 1 May 1998

    Russian President Boris Yeltsin and his young premier didn't have to look far to find their new science minister: He was the previous chief's boss. Yesterday, Yeltsin and Prime Minister Sergei Kiriyenko announced that reform-minded politician Vladimir Bulgak will head up the science ministry.

  • 1 May 1998

    Scientists have concocted a virus that sneaks toxins into cancer cells. The technique, described in the current issue of Nature Biotechnology, could be particularly useful for decimating residual cancer cells after a tumor is surgically removed.

  • 1 May 1998

    Nostalgia may be one good reason for restoring bison to the North American plains, but now there's a scientific incentive as well: Bison appear to help keep grassland ecosystems healthy.

  • 30 Apr 1998

    Ancient lakes across a huge portion of the western United States may have been so acidic their waters would have dissolved a person's skin. The discovery, reported in the 30 April Nature, may force a reevaluation of some of Earth's old watering holes.

  • 30 Apr 1998

    The deadly disease anthrax has been much in the news lately--thanks largely to fears that rogue leaders or terrorists will attempt to wage germ warfare with the anthrax bacillus.

  • 30 Apr 1998

    For Einstein's theory of gravity to hold water, it must be impossible to glimpse the heart of a black hole--a point where the force of gravity is infinite, called a singularity--even from a prime viewing spot inside.

  • 29 Apr 1998

    A robotic vacuum has retrieved thousands of particles that journeyed from the chill of outer space to the frigid depths of a water well at the South Pole.

  • 29 Apr 1998

    Forest Ray Moulton, an American astronomer known for a dominant early theory on how planets form, was born on this day in 1872.

  • 29 Apr 1998

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) yesterday announced the election of 60 new members and 15 foreign associates, including British mathematician Roger Penrose. Membership is considered one of the highest honors accorded to a scientist.

  • 29 Apr 1998

    Mammals were already a diverse bunch during the age of dinosaurs, according to a molecular clock based on genes from hundreds of vertebrate species.

  • 28 Apr 1998

    Scientists in half a dozen countries have been vying to work with Nobel laureate D. Carleton Gajdusek, who was released from prison this week after serving a year on charges of child sexual abuse.

  • 28 Apr 1998

    Armchair scientists can venture 2 kilometers underground Tuesday morning to tour the newly completed Solar Neutrino Observatory (SNO).

  • 28 Apr 1998

    Vast tornadoes ravage the sun at speeds up to 200,000 kilometers per hour, astronomers reported today at a meeting at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) near Oxford, U.K., celebrating the extension of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite for a further 5 years.

  • 28 Apr 1998

    Scientists have found a mutation that leads to an inherited form of heart failure. The defective gene, reported in the 1 May issue of Science, may help researchers understand what makes the heart tissue slowly waste away--and how to slow this disease's progression.

  • 27 Apr 1998

    Naturalist John James Audubon, renowned for his intricate paintings of North American birds, was born on 26 April 1785 in what is now Haiti. Audubon grew up in France and emigrated to the United States in 1803.

  • 27 Apr 1998

    Many wine lovers uncork a bottle of their favorite red and set it aside for a few minutes to let it breathe.

  • 27 Apr 1998

    A nagging problem with artificial hearts and other medical implants is that blood proteins stick to them, gumming them up and sometimes leading to dangerous blood clots. Now scientists have devised a new coating that repels these proteins by mimicking the cells that line blood vessels.

  • 27 Apr 1998

    After polishing your teeth, the dentist of tomorrow may well have you swish a mouthful of plant vaccine. Researchers have shown that antibodies from genetically engineered plants can ward off tooth-decaying bacteria for up to 4 months.

  • 24 Apr 1998

    Although laughing gas was discovered nearly 200 years ago, how it works in the brain has been an enduring mystery.

  • 24 Apr 1998

    Working amidst gale-force winds and torrential rains, a team of researchers has discovered that hurricanes whip up highly localized "rolls" of wind that bring stormy air from high in the atmosphere to the ground where it wreaks havoc.

  • 24 Apr 1998

    Bacteria are legendary for their ability to swap genes for antibiotic resistance.

  • 23 Apr 1998

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--An independent report released here today by NASA's Advisory Council paints a sobering picture of the agency's space station program. After a major overhaul 5 years ago, the planned space station was to cost $17.4 billion and be ready by 2002.

  • 23 Apr 1998

    COLUMBUS, OHIO--A blast of gamma rays picked up by satellites last December originated 10 billion years ago at the very edge of the visible universe, observers reported here last Sunday.

  • 23 Apr 1998

    When natural gas is discovered at remote oil drilling sites, it is typically burned off or pumped back into the ground, because shipping the gas costs more than it's worth.

  • 23 Apr 1998

    Bad weather may have plagued the first English settlements in America. According to a new analysis of tree-ring climate data, the "Lost Colony" of Roanoke Island in North Carolina and the Jamestown colony in Virginia faced two of the worst droughts in the last 800 years.

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