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Science News

  • 20 Apr 1998

    SAN FRANCISCO--Although AIDS patients have been told to avoid strenuous exercise, results of a study announced here yesterday at the Experimental Biology '98 meeting show that they can undertake a major workout without boosting their HIV viral count.

  • 17 Apr 1998

    A chunk of ice twice the size of Manhattan broke away from the northernmost part of the Antarctic peninsula in February, and scientists are blaming rising temperatures.

  • 17 Apr 1998

    Scientists will soon be able to get a peek at exactly what proteins do in the first few microseconds of folding.

  • 17 Apr 1998

    Scientists have used gene therapy to sharply reduce joint swelling from arthritis in rabbits. The finding, reported in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could someday lead to a novel treatment for inflamed joints in people.

  • 17 Apr 1998

    Researchers know well the terrible progression from HIV infection to AIDS, but they're less clued in to how the virus gets a toehold in the body. The virus--which attacks immune cells called CD4 T lymphocytes--shows up early on in the lymph nodes.

  • 16 Apr 1998

    The diameter of tree seedlings may fluctuate with the tides, according to a paper in tomorrow's Nature.

  • 16 Apr 1998

    Solar power enthusiasts have long dreamed of replacing fossil fuels with clean-burning hydrogen gas. Although solar cells can be harnessed to rip apart the hydrogen and oxygen in water molecules, the cells haven't been economical.

  • 16 Apr 1998

    The dangerous pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes infections ranging from skin abscesses to toxic shock syndrome. Roughly one-third of the strains currently isolated from patients who acquire S.

  • 16 Apr 1998

    Like the waistband in your favorite old pajamas, overstressed hearts often lose their elasticity and their ability to pump blood efficiently--a condition called congestive heart failure. The tired hearts are prone to arrhythmias that cause sudden death.

  • 15 Apr 1998

    A grand new research outfit is taking shape in Kansas City, Missouri, that may one day rival the world's large biomedical charities.

  • 15 Apr 1998

    Air traffic controllers and emergency dispatchers must make critical decisions while being deluged with information. Now researchers have devised a test that accurately measures the cool, quick judgment needed to perform well under stress.

  • 15 Apr 1998

    A cheaper, lighter version of the lithium batteries used in laptop computers and cellular phones may soon become available. Researchers have found a way to replace cobalt--the most expensive component of these batteries--with aluminum.

  • 15 Apr 1998

    NEW DELHI, INDIA--A new wheat variety that yields a whopping 18 tons per hectare was unveiled here yesterday at a conference sponsored by the International Wheat and Maize Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Mexico.

  • 14 Apr 1998

    Researchers have developed a way to encode information transmitted by light.

  • 14 Apr 1998

    A toxin that jams a common cellular motor has been discovered in a marine sponge. The compound, described in the current issue of Science, could perhaps be modified to keep cancer cells from dividing.

  • 14 Apr 1998

    SAN FRANCISCO--Forget the clever mnemonics and untie that string around your finger. If you really need to learn something, get a good night's sleep.

  • 13 Apr 1998

    In one of the greatest moments in modern medical science, American microbiologist Jonas Salk on 12 April 1955 pronounced his newly invented polio vaccine safe and effective in almost 90% of cases.

  • 13 Apr 1998

    Score a paper victory for time travel. Physicists have long pondered how to transport a person--let's say you, the reader--into the past, perhaps using as a slingshot the warped space-time around black holes.

  • 13 Apr 1998

    Wondering whether that wet winter was a fluke? Climatologists have come up with a new index that may help people find out if climate change is happening right in their own backyards.

  • 13 Apr 1998

    Tumors can betray their presence by shedding cells that enter the bloodstream. Spotting these rare cells takes a keen eye and good luck, but now researchers have devised a tool that ups the odds of detection.

  • 10 Apr 1998

    SAN FRANCISCO--Ever wonder why your dreams can be so freakish? It's because your thought patterns are also bizarre in never-never land. Researchers have shown that concepts are more disjointed during REM sleep, in which dreaming occurs, than at other times.

  • 10 Apr 1998

    A radical theory of high-temperature superconductivity--electric conduction with no resistance at comparatively high temperatures--has won its first experimental support.

  • 10 Apr 1998

    SALT LAKE CITY--Although outlawed in the 1960s, the Hindu caste system constrained the marriage choices of Indians for 3000 years.

  • 10 Apr 1998

    Scientists have solved the puzzle of a mysterious disease that 3 years ago wiped out a third of the coral at some reefs off the Florida Keys.

  • 9 Apr 1998

    SALT LAKE CITY--A few years ago, the big head of an ancient apelike skeleton known as Mr. Ples challenged the standard view that the earliest members of the human family, the australopithecines, were relatively small-brained. Mr.

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