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Science News

  • 24 Apr 1998

    Working amidst gale-force winds and torrential rains, a team of researchers has discovered that hurricanes whip up highly localized "rolls" of wind that bring stormy air from high in the atmosphere to the ground where it wreaks havoc.

  • 24 Apr 1998

    Bacteria are legendary for their ability to swap genes for antibiotic resistance.

  • 23 Apr 1998

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--An independent report released here today by NASA's Advisory Council paints a sobering picture of the agency's space station program. After a major overhaul 5 years ago, the planned space station was to cost $17.4 billion and be ready by 2002.

  • 23 Apr 1998

    COLUMBUS, OHIO--A blast of gamma rays picked up by satellites last December originated 10 billion years ago at the very edge of the visible universe, observers reported here last Sunday.

  • 23 Apr 1998

    When natural gas is discovered at remote oil drilling sites, it is typically burned off or pumped back into the ground, because shipping the gas costs more than it's worth.

  • 23 Apr 1998

    Bad weather may have plagued the first English settlements in America. According to a new analysis of tree-ring climate data, the "Lost Colony" of Roanoke Island in North Carolina and the Jamestown colony in Virginia faced two of the worst droughts in the last 800 years.

  • 22 Apr 1998

    SAN FRANCISCO--Elite athletes sometimes push themselves so hard while training that their performance begins to suffer. Now a physiologist has measured the toll this overtraining can take on athletic ability, the immune system, and mood.

  • 22 Apr 1998

    The Northern Hemisphere's three warmest years in the last 6 centuries were 1990, 1995, and 1997, according to a new climate analysis in tomorrow's issue of Nature.

  • 22 Apr 1998

    Scientists have tweaked the structure of a protein so that it gets blood to clot 50 times faster than it normally does. The advance, described in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lead to more powerful and cheaper treatments for hemophilia.

  • 22 Apr 1998

    Last February, the idea that it's advantageous for human females to live long after menopause so they can help feed their grandchildren--a notion taken from studies of African hunter-gatherers--captured public attention.

  • 21 Apr 1998

    Reading the lay of the land can lead biologists to biodiversity hotspots. Landscapes with great variation in slope, soil, and other characteristics tend to shelter more species than do featureless areas, according to two studies appearing in the current issue of Conservation Biology.

  • 21 Apr 1998

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--The U.S. State Department has compiled a secret list of 20 Russian research institutes suspected of helping Iran's missile program and is restricting the flow of U.S. research funds to some of those institutes.

  • 21 Apr 1998

    X-rays from a distant neutron star have shown that its massive gravity is warping the motions of nearby objects just as Einstein's theory of relativity predicts.

  • 21 Apr 1998

    Astronomers today unveiled unprecedented views of swirling disks of dust around young stars, apparently the nurseries of planets like our own.

  • 20 Apr 1998

    MELBOURNE--A major network of research partnerships has been spared the budgetary ax.

  • 20 Apr 1998

    In the ruins of a castle destroyed during the Crusades, researchers have for the first time found geologic evidence of a major earthquake that shook the Middle East almost 800 years ago.

  • 20 Apr 1998

    SAN FRANCISCO--Although AIDS patients have been told to avoid strenuous exercise, results of a study announced here yesterday at the Experimental Biology '98 meeting show that they can undertake a major workout without boosting their HIV viral count.

  • 17 Apr 1998

    A chunk of ice twice the size of Manhattan broke away from the northernmost part of the Antarctic peninsula in February, and scientists are blaming rising temperatures.

  • 17 Apr 1998

    Scientists will soon be able to get a peek at exactly what proteins do in the first few microseconds of folding.

  • 17 Apr 1998

    Scientists have used gene therapy to sharply reduce joint swelling from arthritis in rabbits. The finding, reported in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could someday lead to a novel treatment for inflamed joints in people.

  • 17 Apr 1998

    Researchers know well the terrible progression from HIV infection to AIDS, but they're less clued in to how the virus gets a toehold in the body. The virus--which attacks immune cells called CD4 T lymphocytes--shows up early on in the lymph nodes.

  • 16 Apr 1998

    The diameter of tree seedlings may fluctuate with the tides, according to a paper in tomorrow's Nature.

  • 16 Apr 1998

    Solar power enthusiasts have long dreamed of replacing fossil fuels with clean-burning hydrogen gas. Although solar cells can be harnessed to rip apart the hydrogen and oxygen in water molecules, the cells haven't been economical.

  • 16 Apr 1998

    The dangerous pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes infections ranging from skin abscesses to toxic shock syndrome. Roughly one-third of the strains currently isolated from patients who acquire S.

  • 16 Apr 1998

    Like the waistband in your favorite old pajamas, overstressed hearts often lose their elasticity and their ability to pump blood efficiently--a condition called congestive heart failure. The tired hearts are prone to arrhythmias that cause sudden death.

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