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Science News

  • 15 Aug 1997

    Today is the birthday of Sir Arthur George Tansley, an English botanist born in 1871 who was a trailblazer in ecology.

  • 15 Aug 1997

    The controversial theory that fluffy, house-size comets are pummeling the outer reaches of the atmosphere enjoyed a boost last week when a satellite instrument detected signs of as much as 50% more water vapor than expected around 70 kilometers up.

  • 15 Aug 1997

    Sitting in the woods waiting for an owl to poop might seem like an unrewarding research assignment.

  • 14 Aug 1997

    The biological clock of the worm known as Caenorhabditis elegans ticks fast, but these clever nematodes have a way to put aging on hold. In times of stress, such as food scarcity, they can store up fat and enter a state of suspended animation for 2 months or longer.

  • 14 Aug 1997

    ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO--Hot spots of plant biodiversity may also be magnets for invading weeds that thrive in prime growing conditions, according to a study described here yesterday at the annual meeting of the Ecologica

  • 14 Aug 1997

    When a persistent, cancerous tumor starts to grow back after chemotherapy, it's often immune to all known drugs. But new research published in the current issue of Clinical Cancer Research indicates that a first strike with a certain class of chemicals can break down this resistance.

  • 13 Aug 1997

    Physicists have for the first time observed visible light--a soft green glow--coming from the nucleus of an atom. The glow illuminates the atom from inside by exciting the surrounding electron shells.

  • 13 Aug 1997

    Don't just fight the enemy alone--send for reinforcements. That's the strategy employed by a team of British and Kenyan scientists against corn pests.

  • 12 Aug 1997

    At the turn of the century, astronomers wanted to know whether matter existed between the stars, and if so, whether it affected their readings of starlight. Otto Struve, a Russian-American astronomer, discovered that interstellar matter, particularly hydrogen, pervades the galaxy.

  • 12 Aug 1997

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has taken the first steps toward winning support for building a laboratory to study exotic atomic nuclei--those with an unstable ratio of neutrons to protons--that can provide information on topics ranging from the structure of the nucleus to nuclear reactions in su

  • 12 Aug 1997

    A satellite instrument has detected fluoride molecules at the center of the Milky Way.

  • 12 Aug 1997

    Japan's ambitious plans for space exploration are being squeezed by efforts to shrink the country's ballooning budget deficit.

  • 11 Aug 1997

    This month marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery by Sir Ronald Ross that mosquitoes transmit malaria. The popular view had been that malaria was caused by bad air (mal aria) or contaminated water.

  • 11 Aug 1997

    Swept up by the genetic research boom, a Senate panel has endorsed an ambitious program put forward by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to sequence the genes of important food sources.

  • 11 Aug 1997

    ROCHESTER, NEW YORK--The fungus Fusarium graminearum can devastate a wheat crop, killing plants and contaminating the survivors with a toxin that sickens humans and animals.

  • 8 Aug 1997

    After a few stumbles and bruised knees, bike riding and other so-called motor skills quickly become second nature, and they last a lifetime.

  • 8 Aug 1997

    A network of telescopes in the Southern Hemisphere has uncovered a strong candidate for a planet circling a star thousands of light years from Earth.

  • 8 Aug 1997

    Tomorrow is the 70th birthday of computer scientist Marvin Minsky, a pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence--the quest to develop computers that can learn, think, and perform tasks just as humans do.

  • 7 Aug 1997

    Male primates care about status, since dominance offers a host of benefits, from better food to more children. But researchers have long believed that female chimpanzees don't go in for such status-seeking because rank doesn't matter to them very much.

  • 7 Aug 1997

    High energy x-rays are a great way to probe matter, but it's hard to control a beam of them, since they shoot straight through lenses. Now, inspired by the famous "whispering gallery" of St.

  • 7 Aug 1997

    Researchers have discovered a landmark clue to what causes the nerve cell loss in a group of seven deadly neurological conditions, the most common of which are Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD).

  • 6 Aug 1997

    Today is the birthday of Alexander Fleming, a Scottish bacteriologist born in 1881 who accidentally discovered the antibiotic penicillin, one of the most important medicines of the 20th century.

  • 6 Aug 1997

    Although trees stand alone, their roots keep in touch through an underground network of fungal hairs. Now, an ecological study reveals that this fungal network can redistribute nutrients in the forest, shifting them from sun-soaked trees to shaded ones--even if they belong to different species.

  • Physicist Ernest Moniz, the White House has announced, is in line to become the undersecretary of the Department of Energy (DOE)--the number three official at the agency. This is welcome news to researchers, who hope to gain a high-level advocate for science programs in the department.

  • 6 Aug 1997

    Researchers around the world are about to get their first detailed look at the genetic blueprint of a pathogenic microbe that causes most peptic ulcers.

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