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Science News

  • 30 Jul 1997

    BOSTON--Astronomers are used to seeing plenty of planetary mayhem, but the discovery of a 450-kilometer impact crater on the asteroid Vesta, which is only 525 kilometers in diameter, has them wowed.

  • 29 Jul 1997

    Live high, train low--that's the guide to faster footwork, according to a paper published this month in the Journal of Applied Physiology. The study found that runners can shave crucial seconds off their time if they live at high altitudes but train closer to sea level.

  • 29 Jul 1997

    Frustration with the United Kingdom's lack of policies on scientific misconduct has spawned a grassroots effort to deal with the problem.

  • 29 Jul 1997

    Vegetables with genetically engineered pest resistance are already appearing on supermarket shelves, but scientists have had a much harder time controlling the sizes and crop yields of many vegetables.

  • 28 Jul 1997

    Today is the 72nd birthday of Baruch Blumberg, an American research physician whose work has led to blood screening and a vaccine against hepatitis B.

  • 28 Jul 1997

    Scientists have known for decades that the human body requires iron to function properly. But exactly how this crucial nutrient gets from food into the body has been a long-standing mystery.

  • 28 Jul 1997

    Early rising sky watchers can help map the moon's edge with their camcorders. Tomorrow morning, beginning on the East Coast of the United States at about 5:30 a.m., the crescent moon will eclipse the bright star Aldebaran, and astronomers are calling for assistance in recording this rare event.

  • 25 Jul 1997

    ScienceNOW wishes a happy 19th birthday to the first test tube baby, Joy Louise Brown, who was born in England on this day in 1978. Brown got her start thanks to an in vitro fertilization technique developed by gynecologist Patrick Steptoe and physiologist Robert G. Edwards.

  • 25 Jul 1997

    Seven prominent researchers had the rare honor of conducting an hour-long seminar yesterday for President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore on the scientific bases for global change.

  • 25 Jul 1997

    The crystalline ice of snowflakes and winter ponds is a rare commodity in the universe. In the cold reaches of interstellar space, most water probably exists in a strange frozen state, called amorphous solid water.

  • 25 Jul 1997

    BOZEMAN, MONTANA--Antibodies in mother's milk help protect newborn mammals against many infectious diseases in the critical first few weeks of life.

  • 24 Jul 1997

    The British government must spend more on scientific infrastructure to begin reversing a decade of chronic underfunding, says a major new report.

  • 24 Jul 1997

    In frightening situations, behavior is directed from deep within the brain by the amygdala.

  • 24 Jul 1997

    Any regular reader of ScienceNOW has experienced the spates of congestion that afflict the Internet. As computers send volumes of data from server to server, phone lines fill up, causing Internet traffic jams--and making Web browsers chug away fruitlessly.

  • 23 Jul 1997

    Pledging to beef up two areas of cancer research--prevention and behavioral studies--the nation's general in the war on cancer, Richard Klausner, today announced a new plan that raises the stature of those research areas at the organization he heads, the $2.3 billion National Cancer Institute (NC

  • 23 Jul 1997

    There's a new way to watch proteins shimmy and dance as they carry out their biological tasks. Researchers traditionally follow these shape changes spectroscopically, deducing them from changes in the molecules' ability to absorb particular wavelengths of light.

  • 23 Jul 1997

    During the first year of life, babies can recognize surprisingly small differences in the sounds of similar syllables. But in tomorrow's issue of Nature, researchers report that infants ignore these subtle differences as they begin to learn whole words.

  • 22 Jul 1997

    Scientists have shown for the first time that a mouse's immune system can completely destroy cancerous prostate cells.

  • 22 Jul 1997

    Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA), chair of a spending panel that oversees the National Institutes of Health (NIH), kept to his word today, delivering a 7.5% increase for the agency's 1998 budget.

  • 22 Jul 1997

    Advocates of breast cancer research, known as trailblazers for their hugely successful fund-raising efforts, are again going where no disease lobby has gone before: They're hoping Congress will authorize sale of the first postage stamp to set aside money for studying a disease.

  • 21 Jul 1997

    Today is the birthday of Thomas Charles Hope, a Scottish chemist born in 1766. Although he considered himself a teacher, Hope is remembered for two original contributions to chemistry.

  • 21 Jul 1997

    A NASA satellite has recorded a surprisingly large flow of water out of Earth's atmosphere. The results, reported in the current issue of Science,* should shed light on the forces that cause damaging electromagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena.

  • 21 Jul 1997

    NEW DELHI--Industrialized nations tend to focus their medical research on diseases generally associated with a high standard of living, such as heart disease.

  • 21 Jul 1997

    Scientists have shown for the first time that a mouse's immune system can completely destroy cancerous prostate cells.

  • 18 Jul 1997

    In search of tiny amounts of antibodies, medical physicist Rosalyn Yalow developed a technique that came up very big for biomedical researchers.

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