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Science News

  • 9 Jul 1997

    Astronomers have discovered a strange dark mass far away in the universe: what appears to be a huge cluster of galaxies that's almost completely undetectable, except for the x-rays it's shedding.

  • 9 Jul 1997

    Like a mark of death, engineered proteins called monoclonal antibodies are supposed to stick to cancer cells and flag down immune fighters to destroy a tumor. But such a strategy, for some unknown reason, has generally failed.

  • 9 Jul 1997

    Researchers have found that the brains of people who grow up bilingual process the two languages differently from those who learn a second tongue later in life.

  • 8 Jul 1997

    BERLIN--Germany is combining its two space programs into a single institution in an effort to save overhead costs and cope with a shrinking space budget.

  • 8 Jul 1997

    Researchers have devised a new imaging technique for catching subtle differences between benign and malignant breast tumors. The approach, described in this month's Nature Medicine, could provide doctors with the first noninvasive method for diagnosing breast tumor types.

  • 8 Jul 1997

    Women can suffer severe problems, such as osteoporosis, after their reproductive hormones dry up. Now comes new evidence that men, too, tend to fall apart as their blood levels of a sex hormone--in this case, testosterone--drop.

  • 8 Jul 1997

    An epidemic of dengue fever, a viral disease spread by mosquitoes, is now plaguing Cuba, according to local reports. Estimates of the number of cases range from 838, the last official government number, to as many as 30,000.

  • 7 Jul 1997

    Camillo Golgi, an Italian physician famed for his microscopic studies of the nervous system, was born on this day in 1843. When he was 30, Golgi invented a technique for staining cells that allowed him to view neurons in fine detail.

  • 7 Jul 1997

    Britain's oldest scientific institution has finally received its feared death sentence. Following weeks of speculation, on 4 July the new Labour government announced plans to close the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) in Cambridge.

  • 7 Jul 1997

    Planetary scientists studying the images relayed home by the Mars Pathfinder are finding signs that a great ancient flood on the Red Planet deposited rocks at the landing site, the Ares Valles region. But not all experts are convinced by the evidence, presented at a press conference today.

  • 7 Jul 1997

    Scientists have discovered a gene that, when mutated, makes mice grow obese without boosting their appetite. The finding, reported in tomorrow's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, surprisingly suggests that white blood cells, key immune fighters, help regulate body fat.

  • 3 Jul 1997

    Ernst Mayr, a German-born biologist known for his insights into evolution, will celebrate his 93rd birthday on Saturday. In the early part of his career, Mayr studied birds in New Guinea.

  • 3 Jul 1997

    Scientists have found that the devastated immune systems of AIDS patients can rebound after state-of-the-art drug treatment has kept HIV at bay for a year.

  • 3 Jul 1997

    Some cases of a fatal neurodegenerative disorder linked last fall to "mad cow disease" may not be triggered by the agent that most scientists have suspected.

  • 2 Jul 1997

    Astronomers released today the first images made with the help of a new orbiting radio telescope.

  • 2 Jul 1997

    The world's hardiest microbes--those that have become resistant to traditional antibiotics--are now under surveillance. Medical researchers have launched a new program, called Sentry, that links up 72 hospitals and clinics worldwide to keep tabs on these scourges.

  • 2 Jul 1997

    A perplexing thing about penguins is that they can stay underwater longer than we can, even though their blood is no more rich in oxygen than ours. Now scientists may have figured out how penguins do it: The birds cut blood flow to inactive organs and go into hypothermia.

  • 2 Jul 1997

    A major study has found no link between a childhood cancer and exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from home wiring.

  • 1 Jul 1997

    The revolving leadership door at troubled Brookhaven National Laboratory has stopped swinging, at least temporarily, with the appointment today of physicist Peter Bond as interim director.

  • 1 Jul 1997

    Patients recovering from anorexia nervosa appear to have abnormal levels of the weight-regulating hormone leptin. The findings, reported in two pilot trials, suggest that body chemistry--in addition to mental state--impedes anorexic patients from reaching a healthy weight.

  • 1 Jul 1997

    TOKYO--Worldwide studies of climate and oceans took a heavy blow when Japan lost contact with its sensor-laden Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS).

  • 1 Jul 1997

    Researchers have pinpointed a biological flaw that appears to explain why women who ovulate frequently are at higher risk for ovarian cancer.

  • 30 Jun 1997

    After taking a several-month hiatus from the Russian science scene, philanthropist George Soros is at it again: The billionaire financier has ponied up $3 million to create two new labs in Moscow to study tuberculosis and hospital-borne infections.

  • 30 Jun 1997

    Titanic explosions that dwarf even the brightest supernovas, one scientist says, may account for mysterious gamma-ray bursts that flash once a day or so from random directions in the sky.

  • 30 Jun 1997

    Medical researchers have taken a big step toward erasing what had appeared to be a puzzling racial difference in the outcomes of black women and white women with breast cancer.

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