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Science News

  • 9 May 1997

    Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, a British x-ray crystallographer who won the 1964 Nobel Prize in chemistry for her cutting-edge work determining the molecular structures of complex organic molecules, was born on 10 May 1910.

  • 9 May 1997

    Like a desert mirage, a small box with a wire and some sodium atoms can make light curve. This new device, described in the current issue of Physical Review Letters, could someday lead to a new kind of switch for optical computer chips.

  • 9 May 1997

    Despite a sound mind and fine ears, some 5% to 8% of preschoolers somehow confuse the sounds of consonants and struggle to talk coherently. Now scientists think they know why: The children's brains aren't fast enough to perceive rapidly changing sounds.

  • 9 May 1997

    Spitting in Singapore may get you thrown in jail, but in nature there are far more lethal results. When a caterpillar drools on a corn leaf, the offended vegetable releases chemical vapors that attract parasitic wasps, which lay eggs in the caterpillar.

  • 8 May 1997

    Russia's Ural Mountains have yielded what may be the oldest evidence yet for pollen eating among insects.

  • 8 May 1997

    MIAMI BEACH--Russia's Mir space station has had its share of problems, from fires to dwindling oxygen supplies. But astronauts there can now worry less about one potential nightmare: the prospect that harmless microbes on Earth may evolve into killers in space.

  • 8 May 1997

    Corals by nature are stoic creatures, huddling together in their stony reefs to resist the ocean's currents and turbulence.

  • 8 May 1997

    An analysis of squash seeds and other table scraps dug up in a Mexican cave suggests that people in the Americas gave up hunting and gathering for farming at least 8000 years ago--centuries earlier than previously thought.

  • 7 May 1997

    MIAMI BEACH--A new drug has been shown to cure laboratory mice of tuberculosis much more quickly than standard treatments.

  • 7 May 1997

    Cockroaches appear to be a significant contributor to asthma attacks among inner-city children in the United States. A study of asthma patients in seven U.S.

  • 7 May 1997

    UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS--In the quest to image ever-fainter and more ancient galaxies, Dutch radio astronomers this week unveiled preliminary plans to build the world's largest radio telescope--a gargantuan device that would combine images from 34 far-flung elements

  • 7 May 1997

    New combination drug therapies might be able to drive the AIDS virus from at least one of its hideouts in the body.

  • 6 May 1997

    Scientists have devised a way to breach the security of information that might be encoded in photons.

  • 6 May 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--A new type of flu vaccine, delivered in a nasal spray, has produced an immune response in children in a small field trial.

  • 6 May 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has lost another round in a long legal war with animal activists and environmental groups. The U.S.

  • 6 May 1997

    BERLIN--In a provocative speech here last weekend, Nobel Prize-winner James D. Watson ventured into the ethical minefield of German genetic research and the legacy of Nazi eugenics policies.

  • 5 May 1997

    On this day in 1984, virologist Robert Gallo and his co-workers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health published four groundbreaking papers in Science in which they provided persuasive evidence that AIDS is caused by a retrovirus.

  • 5 May 1997

    CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS--An unusual new consortium of companies has inked a 5-year, $40 million deal with Eric Lander, a gene mapper at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), to develop new techniques in

  • 5 May 1997

    MIAMI--A fat molecule found in human breast milk may someday be used to prevent the transmission of chlamydia and perhaps other sexually transmitted diseases.

  • 5 May 1997

    BETHESDA, MARYLAND--Nobel laureate David Baltimore has challenged a basic tenet of AIDS research: that a type of immune cell is routinely able to seek out and destroy HIV-infected cells.

  • 2 May 1997

    This month marks the 150th anniversary of the lecture in which English physicist James Prescott Joule announced his profound discovery of how heat given off by one source is absorbed by another and never lost from a system.

  • 2 May 1997

    Energy Secretary Federico Peña said yesterday that he will terminate the department's contract with the operator of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Associated Universities Inc. (AUI).

  • 2 May 1997

    Mice born with extra copies of a human gene develop learning defects that may resemble those in Down syndrome.

  • 2 May 1997

    For nearly a decade, a cloud of suspicion has hung over the idea that fluctuations in Earth's orbit triggered the ice ages. But now scientists have developed a way to double-check their dates for the corals and other deposits that hold clues to ancient climate change.

  • 1 May 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--National Science Foundation director Neal Lane announced here yesterday the 1997 recipients of the National Medal of Science, the nation's highest scientific honor. Also announced were winners of the National Medal of Technology.

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