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Science News

  • 23 Apr 1997

    Women who have mutations in either of two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have a dramatically increased risk of breast cancer. But researchers have had a hard time figuring out what role these two genes normally play--and why disrupting them has such a devastating effect.

  • 22 Apr 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--NASA announced today that it will abandon Bion, a controversial life sciences project undertaken with Russia and France to test the effects of weightlessness on monkeys in space.

  • 22 Apr 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Scientists have thrown more cold water on a multibillion-dollar fusion project before it even attempts to ignite. A panel of U.S.

  • 22 Apr 1997

    PARIS--The European Space Agency (ESA) has come up with an innovative strategy to ease the money problems plaguing its space science program: It plans to combine two astronomy missions by arranging their telescopes back to back on a single spacecraft.

  • 22 Apr 1997

    For some scientists, a new bank may prove more popular than their local credit union.

  • 22 Apr 1997

    The long-running mystery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--flashes from somewhere in space that periodically set detectors screaming--has taken another dizzying twist.

  • 22 Apr 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Fifteen AIDS-therapy trials planned or under way in developing countries violate international and national ethics guidelines, charged Ralph Nader's Public Citizen organization in a press conference here today.

  • 21 Apr 1997

    Harvard pop psychology guru Timothy Leary has transcended his body one last time.

  • 21 Apr 1997

    Veterans exposed heavily to the defoliant Agent Orange during the Vietnam War appear to suffer from a higher rate of diabetes than nonexposed veterans.

  • 21 Apr 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Scientists have triggered a miniature explosion that may resemble a tiny supernova by enticing a newly created form of matter, called Bose-Einstein condensate, to collapse in the lab.

  • 21 Apr 1997

    Pulling no punches, three top medical journals have squared off over whether and how to disclose conflicts of interest that may color research findings.

  • 21 Apr 1997

    Interesting--but probably wrong. That sums up the reaction of most physicists and radio astronomers to an extraordinary claim appearing in today's Physical Review Letters that space itself might have a favored direction--in effect, an up and a down.

  • 18 Apr 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--A blue-ribbon panel has urged NASA to follow up quickly on recent stunning astronomy successes, from the mapping of the cosmic microwave background to the discovery of new planets.

  • 18 Apr 1997

    To mount a successful attack, it sometimes helps to get a detailed look at the target. Now AIDS researchers have a fine-grained picture of a potential quarry: an HIV coat protein that helps the virus fuse with host cells.

  • 18 Apr 1997

    Scientists have identified the gene responsible for a rare form of endocrine tumor.

  • 18 Apr 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--An hours-long pulse of gamma rays from a distant galaxy is the most powerful ever seen from a celestial source, astronomers said here today at a meeting of the American Physical Society.

  • 17 Apr 1997

    SAN FRANCISCO--A therapeutic vaccine against severe rotaviral diarrhea, which kills nearly 900,000 infants worldwide each year, has succeeded in clinical trials.

  • 17 Apr 1997

    Five scientists have accused some special interests, including companies and medical lobby groups, of trying to disrupt the flow of public health data for commercial or ideological ends.

  • 17 Apr 1997

    Scientists have unearthed a fossil of a primitive snake with stubby legs. The 95-million-year-old specimen, described in today's issue of Nature, may be the long-sought missing link between snakes and their lizard ancestors.

  • 17 Apr 1997

    From a chaotic prehistoric world teaming with 30 different kinds of apes, a single lineage survived to give rise to modern apes and humans. Now, thanks to new fossil finds, two African primates are claiming prime ancestral spots on the ape family tree.

  • 16 Apr 1997

    The odor of rotting vegetables disgusts most of us, and for good reason: Eating bad food can make us sick. Now scientists have tracked this inborn disgust back to its roots--the amygdala, a part of the brain that processes emotions.

  • 16 Apr 1997

    Some smokers may be more susceptible to DNA damage from tobacco smoke and thus more likely to develop lung cancer.

  • 16 Apr 1997

    SAN FRANCISCO--Like switching on a miniature furnace in the body, scientists have created a compound that spurs certain fat cells to burn up calories without forcing them to endure jogging, swimming, or biking.

  • 16 Apr 1997

    Citing examples of data-hoarding by colleagues, some scientists have griped that commercialism and competition are destroying the once-congenial atmosphere of U.S. academic labs.

  • 16 Apr 1997

    Earth is not only getting warmer; it's getting greener as well, says a group of U.S. researchers in tomorrow's issue of Nature.

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