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Science News

  • 20 Mar 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--After Christine DeMark told her boss she was getting a test for a gene defect linked to Huntington's disease, her employer "did everything they could to force me to quit," she said at a press conference here today.

  • 20 Mar 1997

    HOUSTON--The authors of the life-on-Mars paper that rocked the world last summer (Science, 16 August 1996, p.

  • 19 Mar 1997

    For the second time in 2 months, scientists have reported the discovery of a gene linked to childhood glaucoma. This time, it's a gene for primary congenital glaucoma, a condition that strikes about 2000 infants and young children in the United States each year.

  • 19 Mar 1997

    Gout and multiple sclerosis (MS) may seem worlds apart, but researchers may have found a beneficial connection between the two disorders.

  • 19 Mar 1997

    The warm surf of tropical islands offers a pleasant escape from the snowy north. Not so before the dawn of travel agents. In tomorrow's issue of Nature, U.S.

  • 19 Mar 1997

    As more and more tests for genetic disorders enter medical practice, patients and physicians are increasingly confronted with information that can be extraordinarily difficult to interpret.

  • 18 Mar 1997

    German engineer Rudolf Diesel, the inventor known for his durable engine, was born on this day in 1853. When he was 40, Diesel published ideas for an engine that he believed would be more efficient than either steam or gasoline engines. He was manufacturing his namesake by 1899.

  • 18 Mar 1997

    It's not up for an Oscar, but a flick from a performer new to the silver screen is winning rave reviews. The 8-second clip, aired in Kansas City, Missouri, today at the annual meeting of the American Physical Society, shows the first sequential images of an enzyme sliding down a strand of DNA.

  • 18 Mar 1997

    MOSCOW--Russian President Boris Yeltsin yesterday resurrected his science ministry and appointed an engineer to spearhead a drive to reform Russian science. The ongoing Cabinet reorganization should give Russian scientists a stronger voice in the government.

  • 18 Mar 1997

    Human eyes, fly eyes, and horseshoe crab eyes, to name a few, differ so greatly that it would seem nature invented eyes dozens of times across the animal kingdom.

  • 17 Mar 1997

    A watershed in biochemistry--Melvin Calvin's scientific paper detailing the complete biochemical pathway through which plants convert carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into carbohydrates--was published 35 years ago, in the 16 March 1962 issue of Science.

  • 17 Mar 1997

    STRASBOURG, FRANCE--Some 200 prominent European researchers met here over the weekend to launch an association that will speak for working researchers across the continent.

  • 17 Mar 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Citing a stunning decline in leprosy cases worldwide, a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva suggests that the disease can be eliminated by 2000.

  • 17 Mar 1997

    UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS--Dutch astronomers have linked a massive burst of gamma rays last month to a distant galaxy that grew much dimmer afterward.

  • 14 Mar 1997

    Tomorrow is the birthday of legendary physicist Albert Einstein, born in Germany in 1879.

  • 14 Mar 1997

    After a few beers, some people may forget where they put their keys, but hardened drinkers face a greater risk: permanent amnesia. Neuroscientists have suspected that alcohol kills neurons in a brain region associated with long-term memory.

  • 14 Mar 1997

    Biologists have completed their best physical map yet of the X chromosome, one of the two chromosomes (the other is the Y) that determine whether we are male or female.

  • 14 Mar 1997

    When a waiter suggests the salad bar, there is a good reason to load up on the greens: They're full of antioxidants thought to sop up free radicals, corrosive molecules that already had a bad reputation because they can damage DNA and perhaps lead to cancer.

  • 13 Mar 1997

    Flickers of laser light can clock the speed of a chemical reaction, timing the knitting and breaking of each molecular bond. Now scientists have rigged this stopwatch to trip a kind of camera, taking stop-action pictures of the molecules as they change shape during the reaction.

  • 13 Mar 1997

    Despite all the efforts of psychiatrists, surgeons, and parents to feminize a boy who was accidentally deprived of his sexual organs, "John" is now happily married and living as a man.

  • 13 Mar 1997

    In an unusual attempted-murder trial, prosecutors in Lafayette, Louisiana, hope to use a new kind of genetic evidence to help prove that physician Richard J. Schmidt tried to kill his former lover by injecting her with HIV-infected blood.

  • 13 Mar 1997

    The famous martian meteorite, ALH84001, may be cool enough for life again.

  • 12 Mar 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Legislators clashed over whether Congress should restrict cloning at a hearing here today held by the Senate subcommittee on public health and safety.

  • 12 Mar 1997

    WASHINGTON--An expert panel recommended today that the National Science Foundation (NSF) go ahead with its plan to build an ambitious new research station at the South Pole.

  • 12 Mar 1997

    The world should be warming, if climate models predicting the effects of rising levels of greenhouse gases are to be believed. But satellite data seemed to throw cold water on these predictions, suggesting that the atmosphere has in fact become slightly cooler over the last 2 decades.

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