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Science News

  • 24 Mar 1997

    Yesterday would have been the 90th birthday of Swiss-born Italian pharmacologist Daniel Bovet, whose discoveries helped give rise to the modern pharmaceutical industry.

  • 24 Mar 1997

    Asexual reproduction is usually considered a way of life--an evolutionary choice a species makes when the drawbacks of sex outweigh its long-term benefits.

  • 24 Mar 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Scientists should be skeptical of the White House claim that R&D has been protected from the headlong rush to cut the federal deficit.

  • 24 Mar 1997

    For many viruses, infiltrating a cell and replicating is only half the battle. Copies of the virus must then escape to infect other cells. Some viruses explode out of a host cell, destroying it; others, like the influenza virus, take a gentler path.

  • 21 Mar 1997

    Tomorrow is the birthday of Robert Millikan (born in 1868), the physicist who first measured the charge of an electron--an experiment repeated every year by physics students around the world. In 1908, physicists were struggling to measure the electron's charge with clouds of water droplets.

  • 21 Mar 1997

    The immune system works remarkably well for most threats, but not against cancer. Many kinds of tumors can evade detection, and others fight back.

  • 21 Mar 1997

    This week, a team of mechanical engineers set a new record for sensitivity: They announced that they can now measure forces as tiny as the weight of a single protein.

  • 21 Mar 1997

    Molecular sleuthing by military pathologists has exhumed the first fragments of the genetic blueprint of the virus behind the flu pandemic of 1918, which killed 20 million to 40 million people worldwide.

  • 20 Mar 1997

    PARIS--The European Space Agency (ESA) has found a new person to lead it into the 21st century. ESA's governing board today tapped as the agency's next Director-General Antonio Rodota, a key figure in Italy's corporate aerospace community.

  • 20 Mar 1997

    Background noise can do more than distract. In certain situations--like the firing of neurons--noise can enhance a signal. Now researchers have shown for the first time that the coordinated activity of some brain cells may depend on a critical level of such noise.

  • 20 Mar 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--After Christine DeMark told her boss she was getting a test for a gene defect linked to Huntington's disease, her employer "did everything they could to force me to quit," she said at a press conference here today.

  • 20 Mar 1997

    HOUSTON--The authors of the life-on-Mars paper that rocked the world last summer (Science, 16 August 1996, p.

  • 19 Mar 1997

    For the second time in 2 months, scientists have reported the discovery of a gene linked to childhood glaucoma. This time, it's a gene for primary congenital glaucoma, a condition that strikes about 2000 infants and young children in the United States each year.

  • 19 Mar 1997

    Gout and multiple sclerosis (MS) may seem worlds apart, but researchers may have found a beneficial connection between the two disorders.

  • 19 Mar 1997

    The warm surf of tropical islands offers a pleasant escape from the snowy north. Not so before the dawn of travel agents. In tomorrow's issue of Nature, U.S.

  • 19 Mar 1997

    As more and more tests for genetic disorders enter medical practice, patients and physicians are increasingly confronted with information that can be extraordinarily difficult to interpret.

  • 18 Mar 1997

    German engineer Rudolf Diesel, the inventor known for his durable engine, was born on this day in 1853. When he was 40, Diesel published ideas for an engine that he believed would be more efficient than either steam or gasoline engines. He was manufacturing his namesake by 1899.

  • 18 Mar 1997

    It's not up for an Oscar, but a flick from a performer new to the silver screen is winning rave reviews. The 8-second clip, aired in Kansas City, Missouri, today at the annual meeting of the American Physical Society, shows the first sequential images of an enzyme sliding down a strand of DNA.

  • 18 Mar 1997

    MOSCOW--Russian President Boris Yeltsin yesterday resurrected his science ministry and appointed an engineer to spearhead a drive to reform Russian science. The ongoing Cabinet reorganization should give Russian scientists a stronger voice in the government.

  • 18 Mar 1997

    Human eyes, fly eyes, and horseshoe crab eyes, to name a few, differ so greatly that it would seem nature invented eyes dozens of times across the animal kingdom.

  • 17 Mar 1997

    A watershed in biochemistry--Melvin Calvin's scientific paper detailing the complete biochemical pathway through which plants convert carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into carbohydrates--was published 35 years ago, in the 16 March 1962 issue of Science.

  • 17 Mar 1997

    STRASBOURG, FRANCE--Some 200 prominent European researchers met here over the weekend to launch an association that will speak for working researchers across the continent.

  • 17 Mar 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Citing a stunning decline in leprosy cases worldwide, a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva suggests that the disease can be eliminated by 2000.

  • 17 Mar 1997

    UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS--Dutch astronomers have linked a massive burst of gamma rays last month to a distant galaxy that grew much dimmer afterward.

  • 14 Mar 1997

    Tomorrow is the birthday of legendary physicist Albert Einstein, born in Germany in 1879.

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