Subscribe
 

Science News

  • 14 Feb 1997

    LONDON--The universe may not be younger than its oldest stars after all, according to a preliminary analysis of satellite data on star positions.

  • 14 Feb 1997

    SEATTLE--Apparently ending several years of uncertainty, an official of the U.S.

  • 13 Feb 1997

    PARIS--A group of 20 French scientists held a news conference here yesterday to demand immediate suspension and eventual repeal of a new mandatory retirement law.

  • 13 Feb 1997

    Climate experts declared last year that they have strong evidence that human activities have warmed Earth's climate by half a degree over the past century. But computer models predict that the warming, caused by buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, should be twice that amount.

  • 13 Feb 1997

    Hopes for risk-free hormone replacement therapy for menopause have dimmed with a report that a regimen thought to reduce its dangers does not offer complete protection.

  • 13 Feb 1997

    It's official: Yale University announced today that David A. Kessler, who has headed the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the past 6 years, will be the next dean of the university's School of Medicine.

  • 13 Feb 1997

    One of evolution's most intriguing mysteries is why organisms prefer to assemble their proteins from just one of two types of building blocks.

  • 12 Feb 1997

    Yesterday afternoon, Japan's Institute for Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) launched a novel spacecraft that is designed to work in tandem with ground-based radio telescopes and boost their resolution as much as threefold.

  • 12 Feb 1997

    Charles Robert Darwin, the father of evolution and modern genetics, was born on this day in 1809. In 1831, Darwin left for an epic 5-year voyage on the HMS Beagle to South America and the Gal‡pagos Islands, where he began to formulate his theory of evolution.

  • 12 Feb 1997

    The soccer-ball-shaped carbon molecules called fullerenes continue to dazzle scientists, even though they have yet to make a splash in real-world products. Their unique properties, such as their spherical shape, have long intrigued materials researchers.

  • 12 Feb 1997

    Scientists have never known just what to make of flying insects. The fossil record shows that they arose on the scene some 500 million years ago, but just how insects managed to evolve wings has remained a mystery.

  • 12 Feb 1997

    Talking on your car phone while you are driving can be a dangerous practice. A report in tomorrow's issue of The New England Journal of Medicine concludes that you may run about the same risk of having an accident as you would if you were legally drunk.

  • 11 Feb 1997

    The Space Shuttle Discovery lifted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, early this morning on a mission to extend the abilities of the Hubble Space Telescope.

  • 11 Feb 1997

    There's finally some good news for new Ph.D.s in mathematics: Unemployment has fallen to its lowest level since spring 1990, according to a recently released annual survey from three mathematical societies. But not all the numbers in the new survey were rosy.

  • 11 Feb 1997

    The controversy over whether a Martian meteorite bears evidence of ancient life is still raging, but two scientists think they've pinned down where on Mars the famed chunk of rock originated.

  • 11 Feb 1997

    Pathogens that come in multiple strains, such as the influenza virus or HIV, are the bane of vaccine developers: A vaccine effective against one strain may provide little immunity to others.

  • 10 Feb 1997

    Yesterday marked the 29th anniversary of the announcement by British astronomer Antony Hewish of the discovery of pulsars--stars that emit regular bursts of radio waves. At the time, some British tabloids reported that scientists had contacted alien civilizations.

  • 10 Feb 1997

    A clot-busting drug called tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is among the most costly medicines on the market. A single dose costs $2000.

  • 10 Feb 1997

    President Clinton's 1998 budget, which is now being reviewed on Capitol Hill, did not subject science funding to the ax as many had feared.

  • 7 Feb 1997

    Scientists in Azerbaijan, one of 15 former Soviet countries, are effectively seeing the clock turned back to the days when science was under central government control.

  • 7 Feb 1997

    The leptin hormone is no longer alone on the list of proteins that appear to play a key role in regulating weight gain.

  • 7 Feb 1997

    When President Clinton presented his 1998 budget request to Congress yesterday, science funding was one of the few areas favored with an increase.

  • 7 Feb 1997

    In the past few years, researchers have identified more than a dozen genes that make plants resistant to bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

  • 6 Feb 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Chemical companies have sometimes failed to provide the government with sufficient or relevant data to judge whether a chemical is safe for commercial use, alleges a book released at a press conference here today by the Center for Public Integrity (

  • 6 Feb 1997

    A team of U.S. scientists has used gene therapy to slow neural degradation in rats that have an affliction resembling Parkinson's disease.

Pages