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  • 19 Jun 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--As the sole witness for 3 hours of questioning on embryo research, Harold Varmus, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), endured a grilling on Capitol Hill today before the House subcommittee on oversight and investigations.

  • 19 Jun 1997

    PARIS--A common virus may help the AIDS virus to infect some types of cells and wreak havoc on the immune system.

  • 19 Jun 1997

    Researchers have fingered a virus as the culprit behind a bone marrow tumor called multiple myeloma.

  • 18 Jun 1997

    It may not sound as pretty as a harp, but a new instrument that picks up on vibrations in liquid helium is setting the laws of quantum mechanics to music.

  • 18 Jun 1997

    PITTSBURGH--A four-wheel-drive robot named Nomad, one of a new generation of robots designed to explore the moon and Mars, embarked today on a 200-kilometer test drive through a barren desert in the high Andes of Chile.

  • 18 Jun 1997

    The odds are that the world's population won't double in the next century--but that its proportion of elderly people will, according to a new forecast.

  • 18 Jun 1997

    It's official--El Niño is back in the tropical Pacific, and it's big.

  • 17 Jun 1997

    Profits from the British lottery are going to help pay for construction of a National Space Science Center (NSSC) in Leicester, United Kingdom.

  • 17 Jun 1997

    Alzheimer's Researcher to Head Drug Company Program

  • 17 Jun 1997

    LONDON--Cambridge University and the software giant Microsoft hastily convened a news conference today to confirm mounting rumors that they had struck a deal to site Microsoft's first foreign research center at the university.

  • 16 Jun 1997

    American geneticist Barbara McClintock, who challenged the prevailing theory that genes were stable components of chromosomes with her discovery of "jumping genes," was born on this day in 1902.

  • 13 Jun 1997

    Jules Bordet, a pioneer in immunology, was born on this day in 1870. The Belgian scientist is best known for figuring out how to detect immunity to bacteria or viruses. He discovered that a host organism needs two types of proteins to destroy an invading bacterium.

  • 13 Jun 1997

    There's at least one scientist who's willing to wade into the troubled waters at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. The board of Associated Universities Inc.

  • 13 Jun 1997

    After sleeping for 5 years in a mountaintop sinkhole, the world's most powerful radar and radio telescope--spiffed up after a $27 million upgrade--is about to spring back to life.

  • 13 Jun 1997

    The most frequent cause of blindness is the explosive growth of blood vessels near the retina, and scientists may have fingered a key culprit in this process: growth hormone.

  • 11 Jun 1997

    In a tragic end to a story that began last summer, an internationally known research chemist at Dartmouth College, Karen Wetterhahn, died on Sunday of poisoning from a few drops of a potent neurotoxin she spilled on her lab glove 10 months ago. She was 48.

  • 11 Jun 1997

    Researchers have finally been able to make the charges stick against a long-suspected tumor suppressor gene. The gene, called NF1, was pinpointed in 1990 as the culprit in neurofibromatosis (NF), a disfiguring and potentially deadly disease that affects one in 3500 people.

  • 11 Jun 1997

    At first sight, it looked like an ordinary asteroid. It is anything but. In tomorrow's issue of Nature, three astronomers report that a 5-kilometer-wide rock follows Earth around the sun in a complicated, horseshoe-shaped orbit, making it Earth's only companion object besides the moon.

  • 11 Jun 1997

    LONDON--Women with a single copy of the X chromosome from their mothers are more likely than those with a copy from their fathers to have problems coping with social situations, scientists reported at a press conference here today.

  • 10 Jun 1997

    BETHESDA, MARYLAND--The U.S. government is ratcheting up its attack on malaria, a disease that kills up to 1.5 million people a year.

  • 10 Jun 1997

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Rather than try to count each and every American for the 2000 census, the U.S.

  • 10 Jun 1997

    TOKYO--A pledge to reduce Japan's serious budget deficit could put the hurt on several big-science projects, including the $10 billion International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), as well as delay an ambitious plan to boost R&D spending in the coming

  • 10 Jun 1997

    Puzzled by a star that seemed to stay too bright in the sky too long after it had exploded, astronomers turned to their ultimate gumshoe, the Hubble telescope. Now they think they have solved the mystery.

  • 9 Jun 1997

    On this day in 1776, Amedeo Avogadro, an Italian scientist known as one of the founders of physical chemistry, was born. Avogadro studied the properties of electricity and liquids, but his best known work was with gases.

  • 9 Jun 1997

    Just as The Lost World hits the theaters with its bloodthirsty tyrannosaurs, scientists say they have turned the tables by extracting blood--or at least one of its key components, hemoglobin--from a T. rex bone.

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