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  • 23 Dec 1996

    Researchers have detected genetic aberrations in healthy tissue of some breast cancer patients who do not seem to possess a genetic predisposition to the cancer.

  • 20 Dec 1996

    Vaccines of live pathogens have saved countless lives, but living vaccines are not totally stripped of their ability to kill and maim: About eight vaccine-induced polio cases occur per year in the United States, for instance.

  • 20 Dec 1996

    Washington--In a surprise move, President Bill Clinton today named outgoing Transportation Secretary Federico Peña to lead the Department of Energy (DOE) in his next Administration.

  • 20 Dec 1996

    Carl Sagan, the astronomer and Pulitzer Prize-winning author whose books and television shows fired the imaginations of millions of people, died early this morning in Seattle, of pneumonia.

  • 19 Dec 1996

    In recognition of stunning advances in both clinical and basic research related to AIDS, the editors of Science have chosen new weapons against HIV as the Breakthrough of the Year for 1996.

  • 19 Dec 1996

    Heeding advice from an outside scientific panel, a federal judge in Oregon this week ruled that evidence linking silicone breast implants to immune disorders in 70 women was too weak to be presented to a jury.

  • 19 Dec 1996

    A profound change appears to be sweeping the landscape above the Arctic Circle: Northern Alaska's tundra is warming up, perhaps because of local climate change.

  • 19 Dec 1996

    The heretical idea that prions--naked protein particles without a stitch of genetic material--can cause transmissible disorders such as mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in people has just received a big boost.

  • 18 Dec 1996

    San Francisco--Swarms of barely perceptible tremors could provide the best glimpse yet into deformations in the Earth's deep crust--the root cause of earthquakes--two seismologists announced here this week at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union.

  • 18 Dec 1996

    China may soon be the third country with a crewed space program. Industry experts believe that the Chinese--thanks to new plans to collaborate with cash-strapped Russian space scientists--will be able to send their first cosmonauts into space by the turn of the century.

  • 18 Dec 1996

    Scientists from the University of Washington have unraveled the mystery of how Chlamydia bacteria bind to and infect host cells.

  • 18 Dec 1996

    The way a dragonfly hovers and zigzags in the air seems an impossible feat--at least, conventional physics has been at a loss to explain how these and many other insects fly. Until now, that is.

  • 17 Dec 1996

    Washington--You can toss out the window any convictions about the best form of psychotherapy to get alcoholics to quit drinking. Contrary to a leading theory, it doesn't seem to matter which kind of technique you use.

  • 17 Dec 1996

    WASHINGTON--A hundred U.S. scientists will travel next year to Russia's two main nuclear weapons institutes in an effort to spur collaborative research and bolster sagging morale among weapons researchers there.

  • 17 Dec 1996

    LONDON--Claims in the British media this week that the government is set to give the green light to transplantation of organs from genetically modified pigs into human patients have been dismissed as "pure speculation" by a Department of Health official.

  • 17 Dec 1996

    WASHINGTON--Breaking the sound barrier may have been more sexy, but a computer designed by Intel Corp. has performed an equally awesome feat: It is the first to perform 1 trillion mathematical operations per second, known as a teraflops.

  • 16 Dec 1996

    BERLIN--Austria's attempts to persuade the European Union (EU) to help bankroll a major research center there could get a boost from a new analysis by an Austrian policy institute.

  • 16 Dec 1996

    The planetary freak show is getting so crowded it's hard to call them freaks anymore.

  • 16 Dec 1996

    A set of studies in Tanzania has added strong support to a theory that ecologists have long believed but have had difficulty proving: that species are more likely to become extinct in a smaller habitat.

  • 13 Dec 1996

    Arizona's warm, dry climate has long been a magnet for people with respiratory problems. But a report in today's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) indicates that its climate is also fueling the rise of a pulmonary menace: Valley Fever.

  • 13 Dec 1996

    Paleontologists have unearthed in Madagascar one of the most complete dinosaur skulls ever found. The discovery sheds new light on a little-known dinosaur called Majungasaurus, which lived on the island off Africa's southeast coast about 75 million years ago.

  • 13 Dec 1996

    Four space-based detectors have picked up what might be a statistical fluke--or a vital clue in what Bonnard Teegarden of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, calls "the biggest puzzle in modern astronomy." Teegarden is a member of a U.S.-Russian team that announced this wee

  • 13 Dec 1996

    Like many men, male fruit flies have a considerable array of schemes for courting females, from tender touching to solo serenades. But in a surprising find, it appears that in flies all these acts of gallantry are controlled by a single gene active in small clusters of cells in the fly brain.

  • 12 Dec 1996

    Washington--Images from Jupiter's moon Europa released at a NASA press conference here today are wowing planetary scientists, who believe they are seeing yet more signs that beneath Europa's icy surface lies

  • 12 Dec 1996

    Like a billboard deteriorating under wind and rain, memories seem to fade over time.

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