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  • 12 Dec 1996

    Paris--A French newspaper yesterday claimed that scientists here may have discovered a room-temperature superconductor.

  • 12 Dec 1996

    The thought of another human species coexisting with our own seems rather, well, alien. But this may have been the case a mere 27,000 to 53,000 years ago.

  • 11 Dec 1996

    The discovery in Canada of three arthropod fossils has pushed back the dates of the first fully terrestrial animals in North America by tens of millions of years.

  • 11 Dec 1996

    Moscow--Unrest in the Russian academic scientific community has spilled over into the nuclear sector.

  • 11 Dec 1996

    Loggerhead sea turtles, which feed thousands of miles from their hatching grounds, seem to return to breed with their genetic relatives at sites very close to their births.

  • 11 Dec 1996

    SAN FRANCISCO--A pollutant called octylphenol found widely in the environment severely damages the reproductive systems of adult male rats, according to research presented here this week at the American Society for Cell Biology's annual meeting.

  • 10 Dec 1996

    Washington--Responding to critics who say his agency lags behind certain other developed nations in allowing new drugs on the market, U.S.

  • 10 Dec 1996

    London--The British government's effort to shift many public laboratories into the private sector appears to be in disarray after it has backed down from one privatization and put another on hold in little more than a week.

  • 10 Dec 1996

    Since the time of Charles Dickens, people have known that tuberculosis and malnutrition walk hand in hand, especially in developing countries. Poor diets, experts know, can compromise the immune system.

  • 10 Dec 1996

    San Francisco--Scientists have discovered a gene that may cause two key symptoms--mental retardation and nearsightedness--of Down syndrome. The findings were reported here today at the American Society for Cell Biology's annual meeting.

  • 9 Dec 1996

    Ice has always been a slippery subject. As simple as an ice cube may seem, scientists have long been baffled about why its surface is so slick.

  • 9 Dec 1996

    Washington--Painting perhaps the grimmest picture yet of Russian science, a Russian governmental think tank here today presented eyebrow-raising new data on everything from the accelerating scientific brain drain to the decline of federal R&D spending.

  • Mary D. Leakey, the distinguished archaeologist and matriarch of the famous Leakey clan of scientists, died last night in Nairobi, Kenya. She was 84. Leakey made numerous major discoveries--of both stones and bones--that shaped the study of African prehistory and human evolution.

  • 9 Dec 1996

    Researchers have tricked a mouse's immune system into launching a vigorous attack against cancer cells. The body's natural defenses do not usually recognize tumor cells as foreign invaders and therefore do not attack them.

  • 6 Dec 1996

    The biotech industry saw its sales zoom by 18%, to $9.3 billion, in the 1996 fiscal year, according to an estimate released this week.

  • 6 Dec 1996

    Researchers this month are announcing the first major findings from an international project to generate thousands of mutant zebrafish with telltale embryonic defects.

  • 6 Dec 1996

    New Delhi--As part of a massive attempt to eradicate polio from a region, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) plan tomorrow to vaccinate 125 million children across the Indian subcontinent.

  • 6 Dec 1996

    Fertilizers and other nitrogen sources, like the burning of fossil fuels, help plants to grow. That growth, in turn, sops up carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

  • 5 Dec 1996

    Washington, D.C.--The fight between the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and Harold Liebowitz, its ousted president, appears to be over. This week, NAE officials paid Liebowitz $687,500, and in return he relinquished any claim to the job he held until June.

  • 5 Dec 1996

    PARIS--The European Union is about to launch a 4-year, $2.5-billion R&D effort to make up ground in the global battle for supremacy in electronics technologies.

  • 5 Dec 1996

    New calculations suggest that a megaproject on nuclear fusion may be doomed to fail. Scientists have struggled for decades to demonstrate that fusion could be a practical source of power.

  • 5 Dec 1996

    London--Talk about a transformation worthy of Superman. In the St.

  • 4 Dec 1996

    BOSTON--Trading on the Pacific's high seas may have begun 2500 years earlier than archaeologists have thought, according to an analysis of volcanic glass shards presented here at the annual meeting of the Materials Research Society.

  • 4 Dec 1996

    A hole in the leading theory of quasars may now have been filled by results announced in the 10 December Astrophysical Journal. Shining brightly in the far reaches of the universe, quasars are the most energetic objects known.

  • 4 Dec 1996

    A strong heart may be healthy, but too much heart muscle can be fatal: A leading cause of sudden death in young people--particularly in world-class athletes--is a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or enlarged heart.

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