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  • 3 Dec 1996

    Daily injections of human growth hormone (HGH) appear to counteract the devastating and sometimes deadly effects of weight loss and atrophy often seen in AIDS patients, according to a study published in the latest issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

  • 3 Dec 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Planetary scientists announced at a press conference this afternoon that they have found strong signs of ice secreted in a dark cranny near the moon's south pole.

  • 2 Dec 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--The National Science Foundation (NSF) is betting that less is more when it comes to judging which proposals from scientists it should fund.

  • 2 Dec 1996

    Researchers searching for a compound that could block the addictive effects of cocaine may have overturned an unwritten law of neurological drug design.

  • 2 Dec 1996

    PARIS--The European Space Agency's (ESA's) science program committee late last week approved a reincarnation of the Cluster-2 mission, four satellites that are to study Earth's magnetosphere.

  • 2 Dec 1996

    The blood-brain barrier, a bastion against harmful chemicals and microbes, may be a lot more permeable than researchers have thought. Scientists have found that in mice, at least, the barrier weakens during emotional stress.

  • 29 Nov 1996

    Chaos may sound like anarchy, but the chaos that scientists know can be tamed--and now, it seems, even put to work.

  • 29 Nov 1996

    Ever wonder why some people are more nervous than others?

  • 27 Nov 1996

    LONDON--=The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge still have gold-plated reputations in British science, but they do not have a monopoly on the hot papers, according to figures to be published in January by the Philadelphia-based Institute for Scientific Information

  • 27 Nov 1996

    The Hubble Space Telescope has glimpsed massive balls of gas reeling like comets around a galaxy's center. These whirling dervishes may help scientists better understand the strange physics of galactic collisions.

  • 27 Nov 1996

    A fugitive on the lam in the heavens for years has finally been nailed. In tomorrow's issue of Nature, scientists announce that they have glimpsed an unusual three-proton hydrogen ion, H3+, floating in interstellar clouds.

  • 25 Nov 1996

    A collection of Albert Einstein's letters, including some eyebrow-raising ones to his first wife, and a 1913 manuscript on relativity theory were sold at auction today for about $1.3 million at Christie's in New York.

  • 25 Nov 1996

    Scientists have isolated a gene that causes Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), a disorder that destroys its victims' vision within the first few months of life. The finding could someday lead to a cure for LCA, which is responsible for a few thousand cases of inherited blindness each year.

  • 25 Nov 1996

    Archaeologists working in a remote corner of Papua New Guinea have found evidence that the some of the legendary seafarers who first settled Polynesia 3600 years ago were from the archipelago of Melanesia--not directly from Southeast Asia as previously believed.

  • 25 Nov 1996

    Sunlight may use a one-two punch to trigger skin cancer.

  • 22 Nov 1996

    Thanks to Star Trek, almost everybody has heard of antimatter. So when an experiment at CERN, the European laboratory for particle physics in Geneva, produced the first antiatoms last January--nine atoms of antihydrogen--the announcement made headlines around the world.

  • 22 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C. --One of the hottest environmental issues around--whether hormonelike pollutants are causing reproductive and other health problems in humans--got some attention today from the White House, which issued a rough sketch for a federal research strategy on the topic.

  • 22 Nov 1996

    Aspirin appears to protect against damage to rat nerve cells inflicted by the amino acid glutamate, which has been implicated in some chronic degenerative diseases.

  • 22 Nov 1996

    A new vaccine may prevent dangerous infections in infants and their mothers.

  • 21 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON--A new international assessment of student achievement in science and mathematics has found that seventh- and eighth-grade students in Asia and Eastern Europe, as a group, lead the world in science and math.

  • 21 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Scientists have discovered two mutations that may be major contributors to the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease.

  • 21 Nov 1996

    The odds that a woman will give birth after a fertilized egg is artificially introduced into her uterus appear to be much lower than fertility clinics tend to imply, according to a report in the 23 November issue of The Lancet.

  • 21 Nov 1996

    Scientists have found a small region on a human chromosome harboring a gene that substantially increases the risk of prostate cancer, says a Report in the 22 November issue of Science.

  • 20 Nov 1996

    Three days after their Mars '96 mission plunged into the Pacific Ocean, Russian space scientists say they have a good idea what probably went wrong. And they will make a bid to try for the Red Planet again in 2001.

  • 20 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--A protein that seems to regulate hunger and weight loss may also trigger an entirely different kind of appetite: one's sex drive.

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