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  • 22 Nov 1996

    Thanks to Star Trek, almost everybody has heard of antimatter. So when an experiment at CERN, the European laboratory for particle physics in Geneva, produced the first antiatoms last January--nine atoms of antihydrogen--the announcement made headlines around the world.

  • 22 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C. --One of the hottest environmental issues around--whether hormonelike pollutants are causing reproductive and other health problems in humans--got some attention today from the White House, which issued a rough sketch for a federal research strategy on the topic.

  • 22 Nov 1996

    Aspirin appears to protect against damage to rat nerve cells inflicted by the amino acid glutamate, which has been implicated in some chronic degenerative diseases.

  • 22 Nov 1996

    A new vaccine may prevent dangerous infections in infants and their mothers.

  • 21 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON--A new international assessment of student achievement in science and mathematics has found that seventh- and eighth-grade students in Asia and Eastern Europe, as a group, lead the world in science and math.

  • 21 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Scientists have discovered two mutations that may be major contributors to the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease.

  • 21 Nov 1996

    The odds that a woman will give birth after a fertilized egg is artificially introduced into her uterus appear to be much lower than fertility clinics tend to imply, according to a report in the 23 November issue of The Lancet.

  • 21 Nov 1996

    Scientists have found a small region on a human chromosome harboring a gene that substantially increases the risk of prostate cancer, says a Report in the 22 November issue of Science.

  • 20 Nov 1996

    Three days after their Mars '96 mission plunged into the Pacific Ocean, Russian space scientists say they have a good idea what probably went wrong. And they will make a bid to try for the Red Planet again in 2001.

  • 20 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--A protein that seems to regulate hunger and weight loss may also trigger an entirely different kind of appetite: one's sex drive.

  • 20 Nov 1996

    MOSCOW--The director of a computer-science institute in western Russia yesterday shot dead four colleagues, his wife, and himself.

  • 20 Nov 1996

    During its teenage years, the human body permanently shuts down production of T cells--a crucial immune defender against infection--like a country shutting down an ammunition factory during a war. Although the T cells created in childhood continue to work, their numbers decline.

  • 19 Nov 1996

    Legendary TV journalist Walter Cronkite's most memorable impact on society may actually happen eons in the future.

  • 19 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--The latest pictures from the Hubble Space Telescope, unveiled here today at NASA headquarters, reveal that the enigmatic cosmic lighthouses known as quasars reside in many more kinds of galaxies than scientists had previously thought.

  • 19 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Prompted by alarming statistics on the incidence and costs of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the United States, a blue-ribbon medical panel today called for a national campaign against this underreported epidemic.

  • 19 Nov 1996

    Scientists have discovered in Ethiopia what may be the earliest known fossil from a member of our own genus, Homo: an upper jaw dated at about 2.33 million years old.

  • 18 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--U.S. companies are planning to boost R&D spending in 1997--but at a slightly slower pace than they have done this year, a new survey has found. And companies around the world project an equally rosy outlook.

  • 18 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C., and MOSCOW--When the Mars '96 spacecraft slammed into the Pacific Ocean yesterday, it was not only the charred remnants of 6 tons of instruments, radioactive fuel, and other hardware that vanished into the depths.

  • 18 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--A pill that boosts memory power may not be as far-fetched as it sounds.

  • 15 Nov 1996

    As if America's inner cities aren't troubled enough, now they have a newly recognized problem to contend with: leptospirosis. A report in today's Annals of Internal Medicine has shown that living in an inner city is a risk factor for the disease.

  • 15 Nov 1996

    The Russian-led Mars '96 spacecraft is scheduled to launch tomorrow, carrying with it 24 scientific instruments and the future of the Russian exploration of Mars.

  • 15 Nov 1996

    Seventeen medical school professors at the University of Southern California (USC) filed suit against the university on 14 November charging breach of contract in response to university plans to lower their salaries.

  • 15 Nov 1996

    Bacteria have a penchant for reinventing themselves, speedily adapting to new hosts, new conditions, and new antibiotic countermeasures.

  • 14 Nov 1996

    The hullabaloo over genetically engineered soybeans that has erupted in Europe in the past few weeks has spilled onto American soil.

  • 14 Nov 1996

    LONDON--The specter of a fatal disease that eats away brain tissue has scared up serious new money for European scientists.

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