Subscribe
 

ScienceNow

  • 20 Nov 1996

    During its teenage years, the human body permanently shuts down production of T cells--a crucial immune defender against infection--like a country shutting down an ammunition factory during a war. Although the T cells created in childhood continue to work, their numbers decline.

  • 19 Nov 1996

    Legendary TV journalist Walter Cronkite's most memorable impact on society may actually happen eons in the future.

  • 19 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--The latest pictures from the Hubble Space Telescope, unveiled here today at NASA headquarters, reveal that the enigmatic cosmic lighthouses known as quasars reside in many more kinds of galaxies than scientists had previously thought.

  • 19 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--Prompted by alarming statistics on the incidence and costs of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the United States, a blue-ribbon medical panel today called for a national campaign against this underreported epidemic.

  • 19 Nov 1996

    Scientists have discovered in Ethiopia what may be the earliest known fossil from a member of our own genus, Homo: an upper jaw dated at about 2.33 million years old.

  • 18 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--U.S. companies are planning to boost R&D spending in 1997--but at a slightly slower pace than they have done this year, a new survey has found. And companies around the world project an equally rosy outlook.

  • 18 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C., and MOSCOW--When the Mars '96 spacecraft slammed into the Pacific Ocean yesterday, it was not only the charred remnants of 6 tons of instruments, radioactive fuel, and other hardware that vanished into the depths.

  • 18 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--A pill that boosts memory power may not be as far-fetched as it sounds.

  • 15 Nov 1996

    As if America's inner cities aren't troubled enough, now they have a newly recognized problem to contend with: leptospirosis. A report in today's Annals of Internal Medicine has shown that living in an inner city is a risk factor for the disease.

  • 15 Nov 1996

    The Russian-led Mars '96 spacecraft is scheduled to launch tomorrow, carrying with it 24 scientific instruments and the future of the Russian exploration of Mars.

  • 15 Nov 1996

    Seventeen medical school professors at the University of Southern California (USC) filed suit against the university on 14 November charging breach of contract in response to university plans to lower their salaries.

  • 15 Nov 1996

    Bacteria have a penchant for reinventing themselves, speedily adapting to new hosts, new conditions, and new antibiotic countermeasures.

  • 14 Nov 1996

    The hullabaloo over genetically engineered soybeans that has erupted in Europe in the past few weeks has spilled onto American soil.

  • 14 Nov 1996

    LONDON--The specter of a fatal disease that eats away brain tissue has scared up serious new money for European scientists.

  • 14 Nov 1996

    One of the hottest biotech properties--a potential drug to treat obesity--may have encountered a stumbling block.

  • 14 Nov 1996

    A century-old question--whether Parkinson's disease can be passed down from generation to generation--appears to be solved.

  • 13 Nov 1996

    You've probably seen the pitiful photos of frogs with legs sticking out of their backs--born malformed, say some researchers, because of pollution. Now's your chance to leap into an open discussion on the misshapen critters.

  • 13 Nov 1996

    Like wartime operatives sending messages encrypted with secret plans, the brain has a language all its own to represent scents, from the aroma of buttered popcorn to the stench of rotting pumpkin.

  • 13 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--A stalemate that has gripped the longest and most expensive war in modern times--the war on cancer--may finally have eased.

  • 13 Nov 1996

    WASHINGTON, D.C.--U.S. soldiers who served in the Persian Gulf in 1990 are just as healthy on average as those who stayed home, say two new reports involving medical records of nearly all 700,000 Gulf War veterans.

  • 12 Nov 1996

    Sky surveys sometimes reveal unexpected gems, such as unknown planets or variations in the cosmic microwave background.

  • 12 Nov 1996

    It may be heretical for a lobby group to turn aside a windfall from Congress--but that's exactly what some breast cancer activists have done.

  • 12 Nov 1996

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has largely been a physicists' tool, scanning atomic landscapes with its ultrafine probe.

  • 12 Nov 1996

    Some women smokers with a common variation of a gene may be predisposed to breast cancer, says a report in the 13 November issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

  • 11 Nov 1996

    Researchers have found a way to prevent the blood vessels of persons with heart disease from constricting when faced with stress. The results, announced today at the annual American Heart Association meeting in New Orleans, could someday lead to a better treatment for coronary artery disease.

Pages