Top Stories: Neandertal poop, infectious imprisonment, and black holes

(left to right) BERTILA GALVÁN; PIXOLOGICSTUDIO/ISTOCKPHOTO/THINKSTOCK; APRIL HOBART/CXC/NASA

Top Stories: Neandertal poop, infectious imprisonment, and black holes

How stress can clog your arteries

Chronic stress is suspected to increase the risk of a heart attack, but we don't know why. Now, a new study of harried medical residents and harassed rats finally offers an explanation for how stress damages the heart—and it revolves around our immune system.

Neandertals ate their veggies, their feces reveal

Analysis of ancient human poop reveals the caveman diet wasn't all about meat—Neandertals ate their vegetables, too. The discovery provides the first direct evidence that Neandertals in Europe cooked and ate plants about 50,000 years ago.

Chemical weapons watchdog chief celebrates Syrian disarmament

Ten months after news of a horrific chemical attack in Ghouta, near Damascus, shocked the world, the last 8% of Syria's known chemical arsenal left the country on Monday. The shipment was a high point in an international mission launched in October 2013 to destroy the country's stockpile, and a victory for the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

Is prison contagious?

Social scientists have long observed that imprisonment behaves like a contagious disease. Now, a new simulation suggests the longer prison sentences that African-Americans often receive accelerate the rate of “infection”—and might be just enough to tip a problem into an epidemic.

Posted in Scientific Community